My Library

University LibraryCatalogue

For faster,
simpler
access.
Use Lean
Library.
Get it now
Don't show me again
     
Limit search to items available for borrowing or consultation
Can't find that book? Try BONUS+
 
Look for full text

Search Discovery

Search CARM Centre Catalogue

Search Trove

Add record to RefWorks

Cover Art
PRINTED BOOKS
Author Wesley, Marilyn C.

Title Secret journeys : the trope of women's travel in American literature / Marilyn C. Wesley.

Published Albany, N.Y. : State University of New York Press, [1999]
©1999

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM Bail  810.9355 WESL    AVAILABLE
Physical description xviii, 167 pages ; 24 cm.
Series SUNY series in feminist criticism and theory.
SUNY series in feminist criticism and theory.
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (pages 153-164) and index.
Contents Introduction The Secret Journey: The Trope of Women's Travel in American Literature -- Pt. I. The Contravention of Values. Ch. 1. The Not Unfeared, Half-Welcome Guest: The Woman Traveler in John Greenleaf Whittier's Snow-Bound -- Pt. II. Alternative Journeys. Ch. 2. Moving Targets: The Travel Text in A Narrative of the Captivity and Restauration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson. Ch. 3. "The Perilous Journey through the Human House": The Gothic Journey in Willa Cather's The Professor's House and Edith Wharton's Summer. Ch. 4. A Woman's Place: The Politics of Space in Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl -- Pt. III. Travel as Social Reconstruction. Ch. 5. The Genteel Picara: The Ethical Imperative in Sarah Orne Jewett's The Country of the Pointed Firs. Ch. 6. Sisters of the Road: Transience as Theme and Form in Marilynne Robinson's Housekeeping -- Pt. IV. Transformative Journeys.
Ch. 7. The Developmental Journey: Narrative, Psychological, and Social Transformation in Eudora Welty's Short Fiction. Ch. 8. The Postmodern Journey: Elizabeth Bishop's Trope of Travel -- Conclusion Orpah's Journey: Reading the Constructive Narrative.
Summary Travel is the root metaphor for Western progress, a fact particularly evident in a colonizing and immigrant nation like the United States. Despite changing historical circumstances from one American epoch to another, men have generally been associated with adventurous movement and women with domestic stasis, a bias that has obscured recognition of a significant trope: the woman traveler throughout American literature.
Secret Journeys examines the subversive and constructive narrative of female journey from the seventeenth century to the present in such works as John Greenleaf Whittier's Snowbound, Mary Rowlandson's A Narrative of the Captivity and Restauration of Mary Rowlandson, Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Gid, Sarah Orne Jewett's The Country of the Pointed Firs, Edith Wharton's Summer, Willa Cather's The Professor's House, Marilynne Robinson's Housekeeping, Eudora Welty's short fiction, and Elizabeth Bishop's poetry. In recognizing the figure of the woman traveler, Wesley produces new readings of canonical texts that subvert social and political assumptions in texts by men and construct alternative arrangements in texts by women.
Subject American literature -- History and criticism.
Travel in literature.
Travelers' writings, American -- History and criticism.
Feminism and literature -- United States -- History.
Women travelers -- United States -- Historiography.
Women and literature -- United States -- History.
Women travelers in literature.
ISBN 0791439968 (paperback: alk. paper)
079143995X (hbk. : alk. paper)