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Title Health, disease and society in Europe, 1500-1800 : a source book / edited by Peter Elmer and Ole Peter Grell.

Published Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press, 2004.

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM Bail  362.10940903 HEAL    AVAILABLE
 UniM BioMed H  362.10940903 HEAL    AVAILABLE
Physical description xx, 380 pages ; 24 cm
Bibliography Includes index.
Contents Part 1 Medical practice and theory: the classical and medieval heritage 1 -- 1.1 Galen's approach to health and disease: The Art of Medicine 1 -- 1.2 A medieval consilium: Ugo Benzi (1376-1439) 5 -- 1.3 History of surgery: Guy de Chauliac (1298-1368) 8 -- 1.4 Hippocratic oath 12 -- 1.5 Reactions to the 'French Disease' at the papal court 14 -- Part 2 Sick body and its healers, 1500-1700 30 -- 2.1 Medicine: trade or profession? 30 -- 2.2 Women practitioners: the prescriptions of Lady Grace Mildmay 35 -- 2.3 Place of women in learned medicine: James Primrose's Popular Errours (1651) 37 -- 2.4 Lay and learned medicine in early modern England 38 -- 2.5 Physical appearance and the role of the barber surgeon in early modern London 45 -- 2.6 Renaissance critiques of medicine: Pico and Agrippa 50 -- 2.7 Cardano's description of the death of a patient 56 -- Part 3 Medical renaissance of the sixteenth century: Vesalius, medical humanism and bloodletting 58 -- 3.1 Leoniceno and medical humanism at Ferrara 58 -- 3.2 Bloodletting in Renaissance medicine 63 -- 3.3 Attending a public dissection by Vesalius, Bologna, 1540 67 -- 3.4 Vesalius and the anatomical renaissance 68 -- 3.5 Vesalius, On the Fabric of the Human Body (1543) 76 -- 3.6 Fabricius and the 'Aristotle Project' 79 -- Part 4 Medicine and religion in sixteenth-century Europe 84 -- 4.1 Luther and medicine 84 -- 4.2 Church, the devil and living saints: the example of Maria Manca 86 -- 4.3 Paracelsus on the medical benefits of travel 89 -- 4.4 Religion of Paracelsus 91 -- 4.5 Christian physician in time of plague: Johan Ewich 98 -- 4.6 Protestantism, poor relief and health care in sixteenth-century Europe 100 -- 4.7 Rules for ministering to the sick in the Maggiore Hospital, Milan (1616) 107 -- Part 5 Chemical medicine and the challenge to Galenism: the legacy of Paracelsus 111 -- 5.1 Paracelsianism in England: Richard Bostocke (1585) 111 -- 5.2 Sanitising Paracelsus: the Paracelsian revival in Europe, 1560-1640 113 -- 5.3 Challenging the medical status quo: the fate of Paracelsianism in France 119 -- 5.4 Helmontianism and medical reform in Cromwellian England: Noah Biggs (1651) 128 -- 5.5 A new threat to medical orthodoxy: the Society of Chemical Physicians (1665) 134 -- 5.6 Defending the status quo: William Johnson and the London College of Physicians (1665) 137 -- Part 6 Policies of health: diseases, poverty and hospitals 140 -- 6.1 Fighting the plague in seventeenth-century Italy 140 -- 6.2 Plague and the poor in early modern England 146 -- 6.3 Medical advice in time of plague: Stephen Bradwell (1636) 153 -- 6.4 Healing the poor: hospitals in Renaissance Florence 156 -- 6.5 Caring for the sick poor: St Bartholomew's Hospital, London (1653) 161 -- 6.6 Establishment of the county hospital at Winchester (1736) 163 -- 6.7 Medicalisation of the hospital in Enlightenment Edinburgh, 1750-1800: the case of Janet Williamson (1772) 166 -- Part 7 New models of the body, 1600-1800 173 -- 7.1 William Harvey and the discovery of the circulation of the blood 173 -- 7.2 Mechanical body: Descartes on digestion 178 -- 7.3 Debating the medical benefits of the new anatomy: Girolamo Sbaraglia versus Marcello Malpighi 180 -- 7.4 New theories, old cures: the Newtonian medicine of George Cheyne 185 -- 7.5 Medical knowledge, patronage and its impact on practice in eighteenth-century England 189 -- 7.6 Popularisation of the new medical theories in the eighteenth century: the novels of Laurence Sterne 198 -- Part 8 Women and medicine in early modern Europe 203 -- 8.1 Female complaints: the flux 203 -- 8.2 Popular and learned theories of conception in early modern Britain 209 -- 8.3 A midwife defends her reputation: Louise Bourgeois (1627) 213 -- 8.4 Clientele of London midwives in the second half of the seventeenth century 220 -- 8.5 Making of the man-midwife: the impact of cultural and social change in Georgian England 226 -- Part 9 Care and cure of the insane in early modern Europe 231 -- 9.1 Madness in early modern England: the casebooks of Richard Napier 231 -- 9.2 Melancholy: a physician's view 241 -- 9.3 Hospitalisation of the insane in early modern Germany: Protestant Haina and Catholic Wurzburg 243 -- 9.4 New approaches to curing the mad?: William Battie's A Treatise on Madness (1758) 251 -- Part 10 War and medicine in early modern Europe 256 -- 10.1 Medicine, surgery and warfare in sixteenth-century Europe: Ambroise Pare 256 -- 10.2 Cause, diagnosis and treatment of scurvy: James Lind's A Treatise of the Scurvy (1753) 263 -- 10.3 Military medicine in the eighteenth century: John Pringle's Observations on the Diseases of the Army (1764) 271 -- 10.4 Military and naval medicine in eighteenth-century France 276 -- Part 11 Environment, health and population, 1500-1800 282 -- 11.1 Air and good health in Renaissance medicine 282 -- 11.2 Visiting wells and springs in Protestant Scotland 284 -- 11.3 An account of the mineral waters of Spa (1733) 286 -- 11.4 Commercialisation of spa waters in eighteenth-century France 288 -- 11.5 New approaches to understanding disease: Thomas Sydenham (1624-89) 290 -- 11.6 Medical police and the state in eighteenth-century medicine 293 -- 11.7 Medical statistics and smallpox in the eighteenth century 296 -- 11.8 Voltaire on smallpox inoculation 298 -- 11.9 A newspaper account of inoculation for smallpox (1788) 300 -- 11.10 Smallpox and inoculation in a provincial town: Luton (1788) 301 -- 11.11 Cleanliness and the state in eighteenth-century Europe 303 -- 11.12 Use of artificial ventilators in hospitals 305 -- 11.13 Public health measures in Paris on the eve of the Revolution: the Cemetery of the Holy Innocents 308 -- 11.14 Environmental medicine in late Enlightenment Europe 309 -- Part 12 European medicine in the age of colonialism 313 -- 12.1 Ecological imperialism and the impact of Old World diseases on the Americas and Australasia 313 -- 12.2 Health and the promotion of colonialism: Thomas Hariot (1588) 318 -- 12.3 Medicine and acclimatisation 320 -- 12.4 Introduction of European medicine to New Spain 326 -- 12.5 Europeanisation of native American remedies 334 -- 12.6 Reception of American drugs in early modern Europe 336 -- 12.7 Medicine and slavery 339 -- 12.8 Survival of African medicine in the American colonies 342 -- Part 13 Medical organisation, training and the medical marketplace in eighteenth-century Europe 346 -- 13.1 Challenging the physicians' monopoly in London: the Rose Case (1704) 346 -- 13.2 Academie Royale de Chirurgie and medicine in ancien regime France 348 -- 13.3 Medicine and the state in eighteenth-century Germany: the plight of the physicus or state-physician 353 -- 13.4 Reforming the medical curriculum: Toulouse (1773) 357 -- 13.5 Clinical education of the physician in late eighteenth-century France: Philippe Pinel (1793) 359 -- 13.6 Surgical instruction in early eighteenth-century Paris 366 -- 13.7 Popular criticism of the medical profession: Tobias Smollett's Humphry Clinker (1771) 368 -- 13.8 Alternative therapies in Georgian England: James Graham's Celestial Bed 370.
Summary The period from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment constitutes a vital phase in the history of European medicine. Elements of continuity with the classical and medieval past are evident in the persistence of a humoral-based view of the body and the treatment of illness. At the same time, new theories of the body emerged in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to challenge established ideas in medical circles. In recent years, scholars have explored this terrain with increasingly fascinating results, often revising our previous understanding of issues relating to the way in which early modern Europeans discussed the body, health and disease. In order to understand these and related processes, historians are increasingly aware of the way in which every aspect of medical care and provision in early modern Europe was shaped by the social, religious, political and cultural concerns of the age. This volume contains a comprehensive selection of classical writing and up-to-date research in the field as well as extracts from contemporary sources, providing vivid and detailed examples of some of the key aspects of medical thought and practice in the period. These are arranged by themes and so complement the companion volume of essays in The Healing Arts: Health, Disease and Society in Europe, 1500-1800. They are also accompanied by brief, scholarly introductions to ensure that they are readily accessible to both the specialist and the general reader.
Other author Elmer, Peter.
Grell, Ole Peter.
Subject Medical policy -- Europe -- History.
Social medicine -- Europe -- History.
ISBN 0719067367
0719067375 (paperback) £16.99