My Library

University LibraryCatalogue

     
Limit search to items available for borrowing or consultation
Can't find that book? Try BONUS+
 
Look for full text

Search Discovery

Search CARM Centre Catalogue

Search Trove

Add record to RefWorks

E-RESOURCE
Table of Contents
 University of Melbourne Author 
Author Fu, Hualing.

Title Socialist Law in Socialist East Asia.

Published Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2018.
©2018.

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM INTERNET Resource    AVAILABLE
Physical description 1 online resource (464 pages)
Contents Cover -- Reviews -- Half-title -- Title page -- Copyright information -- Table of contents -- List of Contributors -- Part I Socialism and Legality -- 1 Socialist Law in Socialist East Asia -- 1.1 A Brief History of Socialism Pre-Russian Revolution -- 1.2 Socialism and Legal Development -- 1.3 Borrowing from the Soviet Union: China -- 1.4 Borrowing from the Soviet Union: Vietnam -- 1.5 Doi Moi and the Turn to Law in Vietnam -- 1.6 The Puzzle: Legal Resilience after the Fall of Socialist Economics -- 1.7 Legacy, Adaptation and Resilience -- 1.8 Project Scope -- 2 What Is Not 'Socialist' about Socialist Law -- 2.1 Synopsis -- 2.2 Why the Meaning of Socialism Is Important -- 2.2.1 A Brief History -- 2.2.2 Identifying Core Concerns -- 2.3 What Socialism Is Not -- 2.3.1 Socialism Is Not a Proper Noun -- 2.3.2 Socialism Is Not 'Socialism with ''X'' Characteristics' -- It Is Not a Form of Nationalism -- 2.3.3 Socialism Is Different from Communitarianism -- 2.3.4 Socialism Is Not State Capitalism -- 2.3.5 Socialism Is Not Leninism -- 2.4 Conclusion -- Part II Socialism and Legacies -- 3 The Historical Roots of Socialist Law -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Socialist Law and History -- 3.2.1 An Ahistorical Approach to Socialist Law -- 3.2.2 Historicising Socialist Law -- 3.3 Supervision in Imperial Russia -- 3.4 Socialist Law and the Transition to Communism -- 3.4.1 Utopianism and Anti-Formalism -- 3.4.1.1 Anti-Formalism -- 3.4.2 Statism and Centralised Supervision -- 3.4.2.1 Supervision -- 3.5 Historical Development: 1917-1936 -- 3.5.1 Early Period: War Communism and the Civil War (1917-1921) -- 3.5.2 New Economic Policy Period (1921-1928) -- 3.5.3 The Great Break (1929-1932) -- 3.5.4 High Stalinism (1933-1940) -- 3.6 A Socialist Version of Supervision? -- 3.6.1 The Procuracy -- 3.6.2 The Court System -- 3.7 The Legacy of Supervision in the Former Soviet Union.
3.7.1 Prosecutorial Supervision -- 3.7.2 Judicial Supervision -- 3.8 Supervision in East Asia -- 3.8.1 Textual Similarities -- 3.8.2 Selective Adaptation -- 3.9 Conclusion -- 4 Socialist Rule of Law with Chinese Characteristics: A New Genealogy -- 5 The Soviet Legacy and Its Impact on Contemporary Vietnam -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Pre-Đổi mới Socialist Vietnam and the Importation of Soviet-Style Economic, Political and Legal Models -- 5.2.1 Developing a Centrally Planned Economy -- 5.2.2 Installing a Leninist Political System -- 5.2.3 Constructing a Socialist Legal System -- 5.3 From Socialist Planned to Socialist-Oriented Market Economy: Đổi mới and Influence of Socialist and Marxist-Leninist Economic Thinking -- 5.3.1 A Snapshot of Đổi mới -- 5.3.2 The Persistence of Socialist and Marxist-Leninist Influences -- 5.3.3 The Erosion of Socialist and Marxist-Leninist Influences -- 5.4 Post-Đổi mới Political Transformation and the Continual Dominance of Leninist Political Principles -- 5.4.1 Political Changes after Đổi mới -- 5.4.1.1 The Decentralisation of Political Power -- 5.4.1.2 The Liberalisation of State-Society Relations -- 5.4.2 The Party's Loyalty to Leninist Political Principles and the Limits of Post-Đổi mới Political Changes -- 5.5 From Socialist Legality to Socialist Law-Based State: Legal Developments after Đổi mới and the Imprint of the Soviet Legacy -- 5.5.1 The Socialist Law-Based State and Post-Đổi mới Legal Developments -- 5.5.2 The Imprint of the Soviet Legacy on Contemporary Vietnamese Law -- 5.6 Concluding Remarks: Eroding Socialist Ideals vs. Persistent Marxist-Leninist Principles -- Part III Constitutions -- 6 Diverging Trends in the Socialist Constitutionalism of the People's Republic of China and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Leadership of the Communist Parties.
6.3 Commitment to Socialist Rule of Law -- 6.4 Responsiveness to Civil Society and Public Demands -- 6.4.1 Labour -- 6.4.2 Religion -- 6.4.3 The Legal Profession -- 6.5 Conclusion -- 7 Constitutional Dualism: Socialism and Constitutionalism in Contemporary Vietnam -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Historical Background -- 7.2.1 The 1946 Constitution -- 7.2.2 The 1959 and 1980 Constitutions -- 7.2.3 The 1992 Constitution and Its 2001 Amendments -- 7.3 Theoretical Considerations -- 7.3.1 Authoritarian Constitutionalism -- 7.3.2 Negative Constitutional Theories -- 7.3.3 Socialist Constitutionalism -- 7.3.4 Functionalist Constitutional Dualism -- 7.4 Analytical Exploration -- 7.4.1 Hegemonic Constitutional Socialism -- 7.4.2 Nascent Constitutionalism -- 7.5 Conclusion -- Part IV Justice and Democratic Centralism -- 8 Democratic Centralism and Administration in China -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Democratic Centralism -- 8.2.1 Historical Evolution -- 8.2.2 Ideology in the Reform Era (after 1978) -- 8.2.3 Institutional Form -- 8.3 Implications for Governance: Campaign-Style Enforcement as an Illustration -- 8.3.1 The Problem: Wages Arrears -- 8.3.2 What Is a Campaign? Past and Present -- 8.3.3 The 2004-2007 Wages Campaign -- 8.3.3.1 Central Leadership -- 8.3.3.2 Coordinated Implementation of Law Enforcement and Law Making -- 8.3.3.3 Propaganda and Education -- 8.3.4 Annual Wages Campaigns and the 2015 Harmonious Labour Relations Campaign -- 8.4 Conclusion: The Significance of Campaigns and Campaign-Style Enforcement in the Chinese Legal System -- 9 Roots and Routes: Adapting the Soviet-Inspired Vietnamese Court and Procuracy System -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Construction of the Vietnamese Socialist State: Policy and Law -- 9.2.1 Legal Borrowing: Democratic Centralism -- 9.2.2 Legal Borrowing: Socialist Legality -- 9.2.3 Expanding Central Control.
9.2.4 Local Factors: Transforming Borrowings -- 9.2.5 Dynamics between Court and Procuracy: 1959-1991 -- 9.3 Adapting or Transforming? Courts and Procuracies 1991-2017 -- 9.3.1 The Constitutions and Relevant Laws of 1992 -- 9.3.2 The 2001 Constitutional Amendments: Diminishing the Power of the Procuracy and Professionalising the Judiciary -- 9.3.3 Policy and Law Reforms -- 9.3.4 Contemporary Reforms -- 9.3.5 Court Procuracy Dynamics -- 9.3.6 Maintaining Party Control -- 9.4 Socialist Legal Institutions: Continuity and Tension -- Part V Labour -- 10 What Is Socialist about Labour Law in China? -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 What Is Not Socialist about China's Labour Regime: The Rise of Labour Markets, Private Capital and Regulation -- 10.3 Two Leninist Legacies: The ACFTU and the SWRCs -- 10.3.1 The ACFTU and Its Official Monopoly on Collective Representation of Workers -- 10.3.2 The SWRCs and Democratic Management -- 10.4 The Resolution of Labour Disputes, Formal and Informal -- 10.4.1 Averting Unrest by Resolving Rights Disputes -- 10.4.2 Collective Bargaining with Chinese Characteristics -- 10.4.3 Firefighting: Ending Strikes and Quelling Protest -- 10.5 Conclusion -- 11 Strike Settlement in Transitional Vietnam and the Persistence of Socialist and Marxist-Leninist Influences -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Vietnamese Labour Law in the High Socialist Era: Some Historical Background -- 11.3 Post-Đổi mới Labour Law Developments and the Legalisation of Strikes -- 11.4 The Prevalence of Unlawful, Wildcat Strikes and the Marginalisation of Legal Mechanisms -- 11.5 The Emergence of Multi-Sector Task Forces as the Principal Mechanism for Strike Resolution from 1995 to 2007 and Their Reflection of Socialist and Marxist-Leninist Influences -- 11.5.1 Strike Resolution by Multi-Sector Task Forces.
11.5.2 Regulatory Ideas behind Multi-Sector Task Forces for Strike Settlement and the Domination of Socialist and Marxist-Leninist Thinking -- 11.6 Limited Transformation in Strike Resolution from 2007 to 2013 and the Erosion of Socialist and Marxist-Leninist Influences -- 11.6.1 Changes and Continuities in the Operation of Multi-Sector Task Forces -- 11.6.2 The Persistent but Eroding Impact of Socialist and Marxist-Leninist Thinking on Multi-Sector Task Forces and the Emergence of New Modes of Thought -- 11.7 Conclusion -- Part VI Regulatory Approaches -- 12 Is Vietnam Transitioning Out of Socialism or Transforming Socialism?: Searching for Answers in Commercial Regulation -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Sequencing Regulatory Change in Vietnam -- 12.3 Conceptualising Socialist Regulation -- 12.4 Regulatory Signalling -- 12.4.1 Equality -- 12.4.2 Community and the Individual -- 12.4.3 Cooperation and Competition -- 12.4.4 Continuity and Change in Regulatory Signalling -- 12.5 Regulatory Technologies -- 12.5.1 Statutory Rights Protection -- 12.5.2 The Regulatory Technology of Legislation -- 12.5.2.1 Commanding Heights of the Economy -- 12.5.2.2 Foreign Investment Sectors -- 12.5.2.3 Small-Scale Trading and Service Sectors -- 12.5.2.4 Rights Protection or Rights Management -- 12.5.3 Relationally Embedded Regulation -- 12.5.3.1 Regulating the Commanding Heights of the Economy -- 12.5.3.2 Managing Privatised State-Owned Companies: Politically Embedded Regulation -- 12.5.3.3 Managing Private Firms: Socially Embedded Regulation -- 12.5.4 Regulating Consumer and Environmental Standards -- 12.5.5 Criminalising Commerce -- 12.5.6 Data Collection and Monitoring -- 12.5.6.1 Regulation through Metrics -- 12.5.7 Mass-Mobilisation Campaigns -- 12.5.7.1 Mass Mobilisation through the Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry -- 12.5.8 Emulation Campaigns.
12.6 Conclusions.
Summary A fresh perspective on socialist law as practiced in China and Vietnam, two major socialist states.
Notes Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Local Note Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2018. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Other author Gillespie, John.
Nicholson, Pip.
Partlett, William Edmund.
Subject Electronic books.
ISBN 9781108648585 (electronic bk.)
9781108424813