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E-RESOURCE
Author Williams, David R.

Title Bird Conservation : Global evidence for the effects of interventions.

Published Exeter : Pelagic Publishing, 2013.
©2013.

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM INTERNET resource    AVAILABLE
Physical description 1 online resource (593 pages)
Series Synopses of Conservation Evidence ; v.Vol. 2
Synopses of Conservation Evidence
Contents Cover -- Contents -- Advisory board -- About the authors -- Acknowledgements -- 1. About this book -- 2. Habitat protection -- Key messages -- 2.1. Legally protect habitats -- 2.2. Ensure connectivity between habitat patches -- 2.3. Provide or retain un-harvested buffer strips -- 3. Education and awareness raising -- Key messages -- 3.1. Raise awareness amongst the general public through campaigns and public information -- 3.2. Provide bird feeding materials to families with young children -- 3.3. Enhance bird taxonomy skills through higher education and training -- 3.4. Provide training to conservationists and land managers on bird ecology and conservation -- 4. Threat: Residential and commercial development -- Key messages -- 4.1. Angle windows to reduce collisions -- 4.2. Mark or tint windows to reduce collision mortality -- 5. Threat: Agriculture -- Key messages - All farming systems -- Key messages - Arable farming -- Key messages - Livestock farming -- Key messages - Perennial, non-timber crops -- Key messages - Aquaculture -- All farming systems -- 5.1. Support or maintain low-intensity agricultural systems -- 5.2. Practise integrated farm management -- 5.3. Food labelling schemes relating to biodiversity-friendly farming -- 5.4. Increase the proportion of natural/semi-natural vegetation in the farmed landscape -- 5.5. Pay farmers to cover the costs of conservation measures -- 5.6. Cross compliance standards for all subsidy payments -- 5.7. Reduce field size (or maintain small fields) -- 5.8. Provide or retain set-aside areas in farmland -- 5.9. Manage hedges to benefit wildlife -- 5.10. Plant new hedges -- 5.11. Manage stone-faced hedge banks to benefit birds -- 5.12. Manage ditches to benefit wildlife -- 5.13. Protect in-field trees -- 5.14. Plant in-field trees -- 5.15. Tree pollarding and tree surgery.
5.16. Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture -- 5.17. Plant nectar flower mixture/wildflower strips -- 5.18. Create uncultivated margins around intensive arable or pasture fields -- 5.19. Plant grass buffer strips/margins around arable or pasture fields -- 5.20. Use mowing techniques to reduce chick mortality -- 5.21. Provide refuges in fields during harvest or mowing -- 5.22. Mark bird nests during harvest or mowing -- 5.23. Relocate nests at harvest time to reduce nestling mortality -- 5.24. Make direct payments per clutch for farmland birds -- 5.25. Control scrub on farmland -- 5.26. Take field corners out of management -- 5.27. Reduce conflict by deterring birds from taking crops -- Arable farming -- 5.28. Increase crop diversity -- 5.29. Implement 'mosaic management' -- 5.30. Leave overwinter stubbles -- 5.31. Plant nettle strips -- 5.32. Leave unharvested cereal headlands within arable fields -- 5.33. Plant crops in spring rather than autumn -- 5.34. Undersow spring cereals,with clover for example -- 5.35. Plant more than one crop per field (intercropping) -- 5.36. Revert arable land to permanent grassland -- 5.37. Reduce tillage -- 5.38. Add 1%barley into wheat crop for corn buntings -- 5.39. Leave uncropped, cultivated margins or plots (includes lapwing and stone curlew plots) -- 5.40. Create skylark plots -- 5.41. Create corn bunting plots -- 5.42. Plant cereals in wide-spaced rows -- 5.43. Create beetle banks -- Livestock farming -- 5.44. Maintain species-rich, semi-natural grassland -- 5.45. Reduce management intensity on permanent grasslands -- 5.46. Reduce grazing intensity -- 5.47. Provide short grass for waders -- 5.48. Raise mowing height on grasslands -- 5.49. Delay mowing date or first grazing date on grasslands -- 5.50. Leave uncut rye grass in silage fields -- 5.51. Plant cereals for wholecrop silage.
5.52. Maintain lowland heathland -- 5.53. Maintain rush pastures -- 5.54. Maintain traditional water meadows -- 5.55. Maintain upland heath/moor -- 5.56. Plant Brassica fodder crops -- 5.57. Use mixed stocking -- 5.58. Use traditional breeds of livestock -- 5.59. Maintain wood pasture and parkland -- 5.60. Exclude grazers from semi-natural habitats (including woodland) -- 5.61. Protect nests from livestock to reduce trampling -- 5.62. Mark fences to reduce bird collision mortality -- 5.63. Create open patches or strips in permanent grassland -- Perennial, non-timber crops -- 5.64. Maintain traditional orchards -- 5.65. Manage perennial bioenergy crops to benefit wildlife -- Aquaculture -- 5.66. Reduce conflict with humans to reduce persecution -- 5.67. Scare birds from fish farms -- 5.68. Disturb birds at roosts -- 5.69. Use electric fencing to exclude fish-eating birds -- 5.70. Use netting to exclude fish-eating birds -- 5.71. Disturb birds using foot patrols -- 5.72. Use 'mussel socks ' to prevent birds from attacking shellfish -- 5.73. Translocate birds away from fish farms -- 5.74. Increase water turbidity to reduce fish predation by birds -- 5.75. Provide refuges for fish within ponds -- 5.76. Use in-water devices to reduce fish loss from ponds -- 5.77. Spray water to deter birds from ponds -- 5.78. Deter birds from landing on shellfish culture gear -- 6. Threat:Energy production and mining -- Key messages -- 6.1. Paint wind turbines to increase their visibility -- 7. Threat:Transportation and service corridors -- Key messages - Verges and airports -- Key messages - Power lines and electricity pylons -- Verges and airports -- 7.1. Mow roadside verges -- 7.2. Sow roadside verges -- 7.3. Scare or otherwise deter birds from airports -- Power lines and electricity pylons -- 7.4. Bury or isolate power lines to reduce incidental mortality.
7.5. Remove earth wires to reduce incidental mortality -- 7.6. Thicken earth wire to reduce incidental mortality -- 7.7. Mark power lines to reduce incidental mortality -- 7.8. Use raptor models to deter birds and so reduce incidental mortality -- 7.9. Add perches to electricity pylons to reduce electrocution -- 7.10. Insulate power pylons to prevent electrocution -- 7.11. Use perch-deterrents to stop raptors perching on pylons -- 7.12. Reduce electrocutions by using plastic, not aluminium, leg rings to mark birds -- 8. Threat: Biological resource use -- Key messages - reducing exploitation and conflict -- Key messages - reducing fisheries bycatch -- Reducing exploitation and conflict -- 8.1. Use legislative regulation to protect wild populations -- 8.2. Increase 'on-the-ground' protection to reduce unsustainable levels of exploitation -- 8.3. Promote sustainable alternative livelihoods -- 8.4. Use education programmes and local engagement to help reduce persecution or exploitation of species -- 8.5. Employ local people as 'biomonitors -- 8.6. Mark eggs to reduce their appeal to egg collectors -- 8.7. Relocate nestlings to reduce poaching -- 8.8. Use wildlife refuges to reduce hunting disturbance -- 8.9. Introduce voluntary 'maximum shoot distances' -- 8.10. Provide 'sacrificial' grasslands to reduce the impact of wild geese on crops -- 8.11. Move fish-eating birds to reduce conflict with fishermen -- 8.12. Scare fish-eating birds from areas to reduce conflict -- Reduce fisheries bycatch -- 8.13. Set longlines at night to reduce seabird bycatch -- 8.14. Turn deck lights off during night-time setting of longlines to reduce bycatch -- 8.15. Use streamer lines to reduce seabird bycatch on longlines -- 8.16. Use larger hooks to reduce seabird bycatch -- 8.17. Use a water cannon when setting longlines to reduce seabird bycatch.
8.18. Set lines underwater to reduce seabird bycatch -- 8.19. Set longlines at the side of the boat to reduce seabird bycatch -- 8.20. Use a line shooter to reduce seabird bycatch -- 8.21. Use bait throwers to reduce seabird bycatch -- 8.22. Tow buoys behind longlining boats to reduce seabird bycatch -- 8.23. Dye baits to reduce seabird bycatch -- 8.24. Use high-visibility longlines to reduce seabird bycatch -- 8.25. Use a sonic scarer when setting longlines to reduce seabird bycatch -- 8.26. Weight baits or lines to reduce longline bycatch of seabirds -- 8.27. Use shark liver oil to deter birds when setting lines -- 8.28. Thaw bait before setting lines to reduce seabird bycatch -- 8.29. Reduce seabird bycatch by releasing offal overboard when setting longlines -- 8.30. Use bird exclusion devices such as 'Brickle curtains' to reduce seabird mortality when hauling longlines -- 8.31. Use acoustic alerts on gillnets to reduce seabird bycatch -- 8.32. Use high-visibility mesh on gillnets to reduce seabird bycatch -- 8.33. Reduce gillnet deployment time to reduce seabird bycatch -- 8.34. Mark trawler warp cables to reduce seabird collisions -- 8.35. Reduce 'ghost fishing' by lost//discarded gear -- 8.36. Reduce bycatch through seasonal or area closures -- 9. Threat: Human intrusions and disturbance -- Key messages -- 9.1. Use wildlife refuges to reduce hunting disturbance -- 9.2. Use signs and access restrictions to reduce disturbance at nest sites -- 9.3. Set minimum distances for approaching birds (buffer zones) -- 9.4. Provide paths to limit the extent of disturbance -- 9.5. Reduce visitor group size -- 9.6. Use voluntary agreements with local people to reduce disturbance -- 9.7. Start educational programmes for personal watercraft owners -- 9.8. Habituate birds to human visitors.
9.9. Use nest covers to reduce the impact of research on predation of ground-nesting seabirds.
Summary This book brings together scientific evidence and experience relevant to the practical conservation of wild birds. The authors worked with an international group of bird experts and conservationists to develop a global list of interventions that could benefit wild birds..
Notes Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Local Note Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2018. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Other author Pople, Robert G.
Showler, David A.
Dicks, Lynn V.
Child, Matthew F.
Zu Ermgassen, Erasmus K.H.J.
Sutherland, William J.
Subject Birds -- Conservation.
Birds -- Habitat.
Birds.
Electronic books.
ISBN 9781907807985 (electronic bk.)
9781907807190