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E-RESOURCE
Author J Arenson, Kenneth.

Title Australian Criminal Laws in Common Law Jurisdictions : Cases and Materials.

Published Sydney : Oxford University Press, 2014.
©2014.

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM INTERNET resource    AVAILABLE
Edition 4th ed.
Physical description 1 online resource (797 pages)
Contents Brief contents -- Extended contents -- Table of Cases -- Table of Statutes -- Publisher's Note -- Acknowledgments -- Part 1 Overview -- Chapter 1 The Fundamentals of Criminal Law -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 The definition of a crime and justification of the criminal law -- 1.2.1 The definition of a crime -- 1.2.2 The justification of the criminal law -- 1.2.2.1 The principle of liberty -- 1.2.2.2 Morality and the criminal law -- 1.2.3 Possible reform suggestions -- 1.3 The purposes of criminal laws: the connection between crime and punishment -- 1.3.1 Theories of punishment -- 1.3.2 The goals of sentencing -- 1.3.2.1 Deterrence -- 1.3.2.2 Incapacitation -- 1.3.2.3 Rehabilitation -- 1.4 Sources of criminal law -- 1.5 Criminal capacity -- 1.5.1 Children -- 1.5.2 Corporations -- 1.6 Classification of crimes -- 1.7 A doctrinal framework: general principles of criminal responsibility -- 1.7.1 Elements of an offence -- 1.7.2 Mens rea -- 1.7.3 Actus reus -- 1.7.4 The doctrine of temporal coincidence -- 1.7.5 Defences -- 1.7.6 Strict liability -- 1.7.7 Inchoate crimes -- 1.7.8 Participatory liability -- 1.7.9 Transferred malice -- 1.8 Burdens of proof -- Part 2 Homicide -- Chapter 2 Homicide and Actus Reus -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 The legal reality of homicide -- 2.3 Categories of unlawful homicide -- 2.3.1 Murder -- 2.3.2 Manslaughter -- 2.3.3 Defining homicide -- 2.4 The meaning of 'life' and 'death' -- 2.4.1 Foetus and child -- 2.4.2 Death -- 2.5 Actus reus: overview -- 2.6 Voluntariness -- 2.7 Causation -- 2.7.1 Overview -- 2.7.2 First causal test: the operating and substantial cause test -- 2.7.2.1 Take your victim as you find him/her -- 2.7.2.2 Medical treatment -- 2.7.3 Second causal test: the novus actus interveniens test -- 2.7.4 Third and fourth causal tests: the natural consequence and reasonable foresight tests.
2.7.4.1 Fright and self-preservation -- Chapter 3 Murder and Mens Rea -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 The mens rea element of murder -- 3.2.1 Overview -- 3.2.2 Motive -- 3.2.3 Transferred malice -- 3.2.4 Intention must be subjective -- 3.3 Intention to kill -- 3.3.1 Actual intention -- 3.3.2 Intention and foresight of probability of death -- 3.4 Intention to cause grievous bodily harm -- 3.4.1 Grievous bodily harm -- 3.4.2 An objective standard -- 3.5 Recklessness as to causing death or grievous bodily harm -- 3.5.1 The test for recklessness -- 3.5.2 Distinguishing recklessness from intention -- 3.5.3 Justification for the doctrine of reckless murder -- 3.5.4 Probability or likelihood -- 3.5.5 Measuring probability and likelihood -- 3.6 Constructive murder -- 3.6.1 Overview -- 3.6.2 Origins and criticisms of the common law rule -- 3.6.3 Causation -- 3.6.4 Temporal connection between act and killing-in the course or furtherance of an offence -- 3.6.5 Specified offences -- 3.6.6 The common law position -- 3.6.7 Resisting lawful arrest-constructive murder -- 3.7 Temporal coincidence -- Chapter 4 Murder: The Doctrines of Provocation and Self-defence -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Provocation -- 4.2.1 Overview -- 4.2.2 Procedure and tactics -- 4.2.3 Defining the defence -- 4.2.3.1 The conduct element -- 4.2.3.2 Regard to all the circumstances -- 4.2.3.3 Words alone -- 4.2.3.4 The conduct need not be aimed at the accused -- 4.2.3.5 Provocation must take place in the presence of the accused -- 4.2.3.6 Must V be aware of the accused's presence? -- 4.2.3.7 The victim must provoke the accused -- 4.2.3.8 The subjective element: loss of self-control -- 4.2.3.9 Suddenness -- 4.2.3.10 The objective element: the ordinary person -- 4.2.3.11 The first limb -- 4.2.3.12 The second limb -- 4.2.4 New South Wales: statutory provocation.
4.2.5 The future of provocation as a defence -- 4.2.5.1 Overview -- 4.2.5.2 Culpability: harm and mental state -- 4.2.5.3 Anger as a special emotion? -- 4.2.5.4 Anger as unavoidable? -- 4.2.5.5 The law assumes people have some degree of control over anger -- 4.2.5.6 How much control do we have? -- 4.2.5.7 Provocation and morally objectionable standards -- 4.3 The doctrine of self-defence -- 4.3.1 General -- 4.3.2 Subjective and objective test: common law -- 4.3.3 Conflicting case law and the rule in Zecevic -- 4.3.4 New South Wales -- 4.3.5 South Australia -- 4.3.6 Summary of self-defence -- 4.3.7 Related defences: defence of property, others, preventing crimes, and escape -- Chapter 5 Involuntary Manslaughter -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Relationship between categories of manslaughter -- 5.3 Involuntary manslaughter by unlawful and dangerous act -- 5.3.1 Unlawful and dangerous act -- 5.3.2 Causation -- 5.3.3 Voluntariness and intention -- 5.3.4 The reasonable person -- 5.4 Involuntary manslaughter by criminal negligence -- 5.4.1 Breach of a duty of care -- 5.4.2 The standard of negligence -- 5.4.3 Conduct amounting to criminal negligence -- 5.4.4 Involuntary manslaughter by omission -- 5.4.5 Motorists -- 5.4.6 Medical negligence -- 5.5 Statutory homicides parallelling involuntary manslaughter-the instance of assault causing death -- Part 3 Assault -- Chapter 6 Laws of Assault -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Mens rea of common assault -- 6.2.1 Intention and recklessness -- 6.3 Actus reus of common assault -- 6.3.1 Force (or battery) limb -- 6.3.2 Threats limb -- 6.3.2.1 Words alone? -- 6.3.2.2 Apprehension -- 6.3.2.3 Fear -- 6.3.2.4 The imminence of the application of force -- 6.3.2.5 Conditional threats -- 6.4 Temporal coincidence -- 6.5 Aggravated assault -- 6.5.1 Assault resulting in a particular level of harm.
6.5.2 The actus reus of aggravated assault -- 6.5.2.1 'Cause' or 'occasion' -- 6.5.3 Mens rea for aggravated assault -- 6.5.3.1 Intention and recklessness -- 6.5.3.2 Negligence -- 6.5.4 Other forms of aggravated assault -- 6.6 Consent -- 6.6.1 Overview -- 6.6.2 Lawful sporting events -- 6.6.3 Sexual activity -- 6.6.4 Surgery -- 6.6.5 Lawful chastisement -- 6.6.6 Summary -- 6.6.7 Fraud and the issue of consent -- 6.7 Self-defence and provocation -- 6.8 Other offences against the person -- Chapter 7 Sexual Assault -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 The elements of rape at common law -- 7.3 Consent -- 7.3.1 The meaning of consent -- 7.3.2 Withdrawal of consent -- 7.3.3 Does fraud vitiate consent? -- 7.3.4 Consent in New South Wales -- 7.4 Mens rea -- 7.5 Indecent assault -- 7.5.1 The 'assault' element -- 7.5.2 The 'circumstances of indecency' element -- 7.5.3 The 'offered towards the victim' element -- 7.5.4 Statutory crimes of indecent assault -- Part 4 Property Offences -- Chapter 8 Theft and Larceny -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Victoria -- 8.2.1 Overview -- 8.2.2 Definition of offence -- 8.2.3 The elements of theft -- 8.2.4 The actus reus elements -- 8.2.4.1 Property -- 8.2.4.1a Tangibles and intangibles -- 8.2.4.1b Trade secrets and confidential information -- 8.2.4.2 Belonging to another -- 8.2.4.2a Possession or control -- 8.2.4.2b Proprietary right or interest -- 8.2.4.2c In a particular way -- 8.2.4.2d On account of another -- 8.2.4.2e Property handed over by mistake: the deeming provisions -- 8.2.4.2f Summary of 'belonging to another' -- 8.2.4.3 Appropriation -- 8.2.4.3a General -- 8.2.4.3b Consent of the owner -- 8.2.5 The mens rea elements -- 8.2.5.1 Intention of permanently depriving the other of their property -- 8.2.5.1a Motor cars and aircraft -- 8.2.5.2 Conditional intention to permanently deprive -- 8.2.5.3 Dishonesty.
8.2.5.3a Sub-section 73(2) -- 8.2.5.3b Dishonest situations beyond sub-s 73(2): a residual meaning of dishonesty? -- 8.2.5.3c The position in England -- 8.2.5.3d The position in Victoria -- 8.3 South Australia -- 8.4 The common law offence of larceny-New South Wales -- 8.4.1 The elements of larceny -- 8.4.1.1 Taking -- 8.4.1.1a Finding lost property -- 8.4.1.1b Taking by mistake -- 8.4.1.1c Larceny by trick and obtaining property by false pretences -- 8.4.1.1d Larceny by bailee-the doctrine of breaking bulk -- 8.4.1.1e The statutory offence of larceny by bailee in New South Wales -- 8.4.1.1f Embezzlement and similar statutory offences -- 8.4.1.1g Larceny by clerk or servant -- 8.4.1.1h Larceny by intimidation -- 8.4.1.1i Cognate offences in New South Wales -- 8.4.1.2 Carrying away -- 8.4.1.3 Personal property -- 8.4.1.4 Of another -- 8.4.1.5 With intent to steal -- 8.4.1.5a Fraudulently -- 8.4.1.5b Without claim of legal right made in good faith -- 8.4.1.5c Intention to permanently deprive -- 8.4.2 Scope and limits of larceny -- Chapter 9 Deception and Fraud Offences -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Victoria -- 9.2.1 Obtaining property by deception -- 9.2.1.1 The elements of the offence -- 9.2.2 The actus reus elements -- 9.2.2.1 Property -- 9.2.2.2 Belonging to another -- 9.2.2.3 Obtain -- 9.2.2.4 Deception-has both an actus reus and a mens rea component -- 9.2.2.5 The obtaining must be by way of a deception -- 9.2.3 The mens rea elements -- 9.2.3.1 Dishonesty -- 9.2.3.2 Intention to permanently deprive -- 9.2.3.3 The mens rea component of a deception -- 9.2.4 Obtaining financial advantage by deception -- 9.2.4.1 Statement of offence -- 9.2.4.2 Financial advantage -- 9.2.4.3 Cases involving cheque cards and credit cards -- 9.2.4.4 Must the person who is deceived also be the person from whom the pecuniary or financial advantage is obtained?.
9.3 South Australia.
Notes Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Local Note Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2018. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Other author Bagaric, Mirko.
Gillies, Peter.
Subject Criminal law - Australia.
Electronic books.
ISBN 9780195597141 (electronic bk.)
9780195588736