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Cover Art
PRINTED BOOKS
Author Woodbury, Robert (Robert Francis), 1955- author.

Title Elements of parametric design / Robert Woodbury with contributions by Onur Yüce Gün, Brady Peters and Mehdi (Roham) Sheikholeslami.

Published Abingdon, England ; New York, N.Y. : Routledge, 2010.
©2010.

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM Archit High Use  620.0042 WOOD  SEVEN DAY LOAN  AVAILABLE
Physical description xi, 300 pages : color illustrations ; 25 cm
Notes Formerly CIP. Uk.
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (pages 289 - 294) and index.
Contents 1.Introduction -- 2.What is parametric modeling? -- 3.How designers use parameters -- 3.1.Conventional and parametric -- 3.2.New skills -- 3.2.1.Conceiving data flow -- 3.2.2.Dividing to conquer -- 3.2.3.Naming -- 3.2.4.Thinking with abstraction -- 3.2.5.Thinking mathematically -- 3.2.6.Thinking algorithmically -- 3.3.New strategies -- 3.3.1.Sketching -- 3.3.2.Throw code away -- 3.3.3.Copy and modify -- 3.3.4.Search for form -- 3.3.5.Use mathematics and computation to understand design -- 3.3.6.Defer decisions -- 3.3.7.Make modules -- 3.3.8.Help others -- 3.3.9.Develop your toolbox -- 4.Programming -- 4.1.Values -- 4.2.Variables -- 4.3.Expressions -- 4.4.Statements -- 4.5.Control statements -- 4.6.Functions -- 4.7.Types -- 4.8.Objects, classes & methods -- 4.9.Data structures, viz. lists -- 4.10.Conventions for this book -- 4.11.It's more than writing code -- 4.12.Parameter + Algorithm -- 4.13.End-user programming -- 5.The New Elephant House --
5.1.Introduction -- 5.2.Capturing design intent -- 5.3.The torus -- 5.4.Structure generator -- 5.5.Frit generator -- 5.6.Conclusions -- 6.Geometry -- 6.1.Vectors and points -- 6.1.1.Points -- 6.1.2.Vectors -- 6.1.3.Vectors and points are different -- 6.1.4.The arithmetic of vectors -- 6.1.5.The arithmetic of points -- 6.1.6.Combining vectors -- 6.1.7.Length and distance -- 6.1.8.Bound and free vectors -- 6.1.9.The scalar product -- 6.1.10.Projecting one vector onto another -- 6.1.11.Converse projection -- 6.2.Lines in 2D -- 6.2.1.Explicit equation -- 6.2.2.Implicit equation -- 6.2.3.Line operator -- 6.2.4.Normal-point equation -- 6.2.5.Parametric equation -- 6.2.6.Projecting a point to a line -- 6.3.Lines in 3D -- 6.4.Planes -- 6.4.1.Normal vector -- 6.4.2.Implicit equation -- 6.4.3.Normal-point equation -- 6.4.4.Plane operator -- 6.4.5.Parametric equation -- 6.4.6.Projecting a point onto a plane -- 6.5.Coordinate systems = frames --
6.5.1.Generating frames: the cross product -- 6.5.2.Representing frames -- 6.5.3.Matrices as representations -- 6.5.4.Matrices as mappings -- 6.5.5.Matrices as transformations -- 6.6.Geometrically significant vector bases -- 6.7.Composing vector bases -- 6.7.1.Which comes first? Translation or rotation? -- 6.8.Intersections -- 6.8.1.Do two objects intersect? -- 6.8.2.Generate an object lying on another object -- 6.8.3.Intersect two objects -- 6.8.4.Closest fitting object -- 6.9.Curves -- 6.9.1.Conic sections -- 6.9.2.When conic sections are not enough -- 6.9.3.Interpolation versus approximation -- 6.9.4.Linear interpolation [≡] tweening -- 6.9.5.Parametric curve representations -- 6.9.6.Relating objects to curves -- 6.9.7.Continuity: when curves join -- 6.9.8.Bezier curves - the most simple kind of free-form curve -- 6.9.9.Order and degree -- 6.9.10.Bezier curve properties -- 6.9.11.Joining Bezier curves -- 6.9.12.B-Spline curves --
6.9.13.Non-uniform rational B-Spline curves -- 6.9.14.The rule of four and five -- 6.10.Parametric surfaces -- 7.Geometric gestures -- 7.1.Geometrical fluidity: White Magnolia Tower -- 7.2.Designing with bits: Nanjing South Station -- 7.3.Alternative design thinking -- 8.Patterns for parametric design -- 8.1.The structure of design patterns -- 8.2.Learning parametric modeling with patterns -- 8.3.Working with design patterns -- 8.4.Writing design patterns -- 8.5.Clear Names -- 8.6.Controller -- 8.7.Jig -- 8.8.Increment -- 8.9.Point Collection -- 8.10.Place Holder -- 8.11.Projection -- 8.12.Reactor -- 8.13.Reporter -- 8.14.Selector -- 8.15.Mapping -- 8.16.Recursion -- 8.17.Goal Seeker -- 9.Design space exploration -- 9.1.Introduction -- 9.1.1.Design space -- 9.1.2.Alternatives and variations -- 9.2.Hysterical space -- 9.2.1.Recorder pattern -- 9.2.2.Hysterical State pattern -- 9.3.Case study -- 9.4.Representing the hysterical space --
9.5.Visualizing the hysterical space -- 9.6.Conclusion.
Summary Driven by new computer and digital fabrication tools, the architectural designs that are being built are pushing boundaries of form, customization and construction. Pushed by practices wanting and needing to produce novelty, computer-aided design systems are increasingly parametric - that is, they represent designs that change with their input data. Such systems give more control and capability to designers, but require much more comprehensive understanding if they are to be used effectively. Mastering these ideas requires skill as designer, mathematician and computer scientist. This book teaches what new knowledge and skills designers need to master the parametric and how they can learn and use it. It demonstrates clearly how using patterns to think about and work with parametric modeling helps designers master the new complexity of the design systems.
Other author Gün, Onur Yüce, contributor.
Peters, Brady, contributor.
Sheikholeslami, Mehdi (Roham), contributor.
Subject Computer-aided design.
Standard Number 99937503477
ISBN 9780415779876 (paperback: alk. paper)
9780415779869 (hbk : alk. paper)
0415779863 (hardback)
0415779871 (paperback)