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LEADER 00000cam a2200361 a 4500 
008    020423s2002    nju      b    000 0 eng   
010    2002070374 
020    0691096082|q(cloth : alk. paper) 
035    .b27393604 
040    DLC|beng|cDLC|dVU 
042    pcc 
050 00 BJ1401|b.N45 2002 
082 00 170|221 
100 1  Neiman, Susan.|0http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/
       n91062059 
245 10 Evil in modern thought :|ban alternative history of 
       philosophy /|cSusan Neiman. 
264  1 Princeton, N.J. :|bPrinceton University Press,|c2002. 
300    xii, 358 pages ;|c24 cm 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    unmediated|bn|2rdamedia 
338    volume|bnc|2rdacarrier 
504    Includes bibliographical references. 
505 00 |gChapter 1|tFire from Heaven|g14 --|tGod's Advocates: 
       Leibniz and Pope|g18 --|tNewton of the Mind: Jean-Jacques 
       Rousseau|g36 --|tDivided Wisdom: Immanuel Kant|g57 --
       |tReal and Rational: Hegel and Marx|g84 --|gChapter 2
       |tCondemning the Architect|g113 --|tRaw Material: Bayle's 
       Dictionary|g116 --|tVoltaire's Destinies|g128 --
       |tImpotence of Reason: David Hume|g148 --|tEnd of the 
       Tunnel: The Marquis de Sade|g170 --|tSchopenhauer: The 
       World as Tribunal|g196 --|gChapter 3|tEnds of an Illusion
       |g203 --|tEternal Choices: Nietzsche on Redemption|g206 --
       |tOn Consolation: Freud vs. Providence|g227 --|gChapter 4
       |tHomeless|g238 --|tEarthquakes: Why Lisbon?|g240 --|tMass
       Murders: Why Auschwitz?|g250 --|tLosses: Ending Modern 
       Theodicies|g258 --|tIntentions: Meaning and Malice|g267 --
       |tTerror: After September 11|g281 --|tRemains: Camus, 
       Arendt, Critical Theory, Rawls|g288 --|tOrigins: 
       Sufficient Reason|g314. 
520    Evil threatens human reason, for it challenges our hope 
       that the world makes sense. For eighteenth-century 
       Europeans, the Lisbon earthquake was manifest evil. Today 
       we view evil as a matter of human cruelty, and Auschwitz 
       as its extreme incarnation. Examining our understanding of
       evil from the Inquisition to contemporary terrorism, Susan
       Neiman explores who we have become in the three centuries 
       that separate us from the early Enlightenment. In the 
       process, she rewrites the history of modern thought and 
       points philosophy back to the questions that originally 
       animated it. 
520 80 Whether expressed in theological or secular terms, evil 
       poses a problem about the world's intelligibility. It 
       confronts philosophy with fundamental questions: Can there
       be meaning in a world where innocents suffer? Can belief 
       in divine power or human progress survive a cataloging of 
       evil? Is evil profound or banal? Neiman argues that these 
       questions impelled modern philosophy. Traditional 
       philosophers from Leibniz to Hegel sought to defend the 
       Creator of a world containing evil. Inevitably, their 
       efforts -- combined with those of more literary figures 
       like Pope, Voltaire, and the Marquis de Sade -- eroded 
       belief in God's benevolence, power, and relevance, until 
       Nietzsche claimed He had been murdered. They also yielded 
       the distinction between natural and moral evil that we now
       take for granted. Neiman turns to consider philosophy's 
       response to the Holocaust as a final moral evil, 
       concluding that two basic stances run through modern 
       thought. One, from Rousseau to Arendt, insists that 
       morality demands we make evil intelligible. The other, 
       from Voltaire to Adorno, insists that morality demands 
       that we don't. 
520 80 Beautifully written and thoroughly engaging, this book 
       tells the history of modern philosophy as an attempt to 
       come to terms with evil. It reintroduces philosophy to 
       anyone interested in questions of life and death, good and
       evil, suffering and sense. 
650  0 Good and evil|xHistory.|0http://id.loc.gov/authorities/
       subjects/sh2009125989 
650  0 Philosophy, Modern.|0http://id.loc.gov/authorities/
       subjects/sh85100960 
907    .b27393604 
984    VU|b.b27393604|cheld 
990    MARCIVE MELB 201906 
990    Uploaded Oct 02 
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