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PRINTED BOOKS
Author Nuttall, Jon.

Title Moral questions : an introduction to ethics / Jon Nuttall.

Published Cambridge, UK ; Cambridge, MA, USA : Polity Press, 1993.

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM Bail  170 NUTT    AVAILABLE
Physical description xiv, 214 pages ; 24 cm
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (pages [208]-211) and index.
Contents 1 Applying Philosophy to Moral Issues 1 -- Why bother with moral philosophy? 1 -- Changes contributing to moral doubts 2 -- Influence of philosophers on morality 5 -- Can philosophy help decide moral issues? 6 -- Limitations of philosophy 10 -- 2 Giving Reasons and Making Judgements 12 -- Discriminating the good from the bad 12 -- Making moral judgements 14 -- Can moral judgements provide reasons for action? 17 -- Do reasons have to be watertight? 20 -- Do we always do what we most want to do? 22 -- Can morality rest on the authority of God? 24 -- 3 Finding Grounds for Moral and Religious Education 27 -- Objectivity of judgements 27 -- Rationality of religious beliefs 29 -- Should we be judging others? 32 -- Implications of universalizability 35 -- Is the moral educator no more than a logician? 38 -- Can there be moral facts? 40 -- What is the job of the moral educator? 44 -- 4 Punishment and Responsibility 47 -- Can two wrongs make a right? 47 -- Just deserts or preventive measures? 49 -- Are we responsible for our actions? 53 -- Are our actions determined? 55 -- Determinism and fatalism 57 -- Are effects determined by causes? 59 -- Connection between punishment and evaluation 63 -- 5 Sex and Morality 65 -- Does sex have any special moral significance? 65 -- Nature as a guide to morality 68 -- Is sex part of our animal nature? 72 -- Sexual arousal 74 -- Sexual perversions 75 -- Sexual intercourse and other activities 78 -- Intimacy between persons 80 -- Particular nature of sex 82 -- Rape 83 -- Promiscuity, masturbation and pornography 85 -- Prostitution 86 -- Homosexuality 87 -- Sexual morality 88 -- 6 Pornography, Violence and Censorship 89 -- Should we worry only about harmful consequences? 89 -- Depiction of sex and violence 92 -- Justifying censorship 96 -- 7 Abortion 99 -- Abortion and sex 99 -- Drawing the line 101 -- Significance of conception 105 -- Significance of birth 106 -- Viability 107 -- What is important about persons? 108 -- Rights of the unborn 109 -- 8 Persons, Children and Embryos 116 -- Conception in a dish 116 -- Genetic engineering 117 -- Status of 'spare' embryos 119 -- When do children become people? 123 -- Ownership of embryos 126 -- Surrogacy 127 -- 9 Suicide and the Value of Life 132 -- Is suicide a question for morality? 132 -- What counts as suicide? 134 -- Valuing life 136 -- Can life have value other than as a benefit? 140 -- Finding value in purpose 142 -- Passing judgement on suicide 147 -- 10 Euthanasia 149 -- Euthanasia as a benefit 149 -- Active/passive distinction 149 -- What weight should be given to wishes? 152 -- Voluntary euthanasia 153 -- Involuntary euthanasia 154 -- Non-voluntary euthanasia 155 -- Killing or letting die--further considerations 158 -- 11 War, Terrorism and Protest 161 -- Justification of war 161 -- Is all fair in war? 165 -- Ends and means 169 -- Problems of 'total war' 173 -- Attitudes towards terrorism 175 -- 12 Animal Rights 178 -- Ways of mistreating animals 178 -- Rights and obligations 180 -- Basis of rights 182 -- Rights of persons 184 -- Do animals have rights? 189 -- Vegetarianism 191 -- 13 Fitting Persons into Theories 194 -- Motives for theorizing 194 -- Utilitarianism 195 -- Objections to utilitarianism 196 -- Rule utilitarianism 199 -- Moral theories compared to scientific theories 199 -- Kant's moral theory 201 -- Different interests of people 203 -- Adopting a moral viewpoint 206.
Summary This new introduction to ethics is written for students who are approaching philosophy for the first time. Nuttall focuses on a range of practical and topical questions, using these as a way of drawing the reader into the distinctive methods of philosophical analysis.
The book starts with a discussion of values and judgments and this is developed in later chapters on moral and religious education and punishment. Nuttall then looks at sexual morality, with related chapters on pornography, abortion, foetal research and children. Finally, he examines moral issues surrounding death: suicide, war and euthanasia. Here questions relating to the value and purpose of life are confronted. The issue of animal rights is used as an opportunity to explore the question of rights in general, and the book concludes with a chapter on moral theories. Clear, lively and accessible, Moral Questions is an ideal text book for 'A' level philosophy and for introductory courses in practical methods and moral philosophy.
Subject Ethics.
ISBN 0745610390 (acid-free paper)
0745610404 (paperback: acid-free paper)