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Book Cover
PRINTED BOOKS
Author Speight, James G.

Title Clear and concise communications for scientists and engineers / James G. Speight.

Published Boca Raton, FL : CRC Press, [2012]
©2012

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM ERC  808.0665 SPEI    AVAILABLE
Physical description vii, 200 pages ; 23 cm
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents Chapter 1 Scientific and Engineering Writing 1 -- 1.1 Introduction 1 -- 1.2 Definitions 7 -- 1.3 Career Writing 8 -- 1.4 Purpose of the Book 12 -- References 15 -- Chapter 2 Types of Scientific and Engineering Writing 17 -- 2.1 Technical Paper 17 -- 2.2 Project Report 21 -- 2.3 Funding Proposal 26 -- 2.4 Reports to a Court 31 -- 2.5 Theses 34 -- References 38 -- Chapter 3 Appearance and Physical Layout 39 -- 3.1 Anatomy of a Manuscript 39 -- 3.2 Page Layout 47 -- 3.3 Font Type and Size 48 -- 3.4 Text Alignment 50 -- 3.5 Section Headings and Numbering 51 -- 3.6 Editing 54 -- References 55 -- Chapter 4 Audience 57 -- 4.1 Introduction 57 -- 4.2 Types of Audiences 60 -- 4.3 Audience Analysis 68 -- 4.4 Audience Adaptation 69 -- References 71 -- Chapter 5 Preparing to Write 73 -- 5.1 Records and Notes 73 -- 5.2 Organization and Focus of the Work 74 -- 5.3 Timeline/Schedule 80 -- 5.4 Authorship 82 -- 5.5 References and Citations 85 -- 5.6 Biographies and Résumés 87 -- 5.7 Reader 88 -- References 89 -- Chapter 6 Writing Style 91 -- 6.1 Getting Started 91 -- 6.2 Selecting the Format 94 -- 6.3 Clear, Concise, and Understandable 96 -- 6.4 Getting to the Point 98 -- 6.5 Minimizing Verbal Overkill 101 -- 6.6 Ethics in Writing 103 -- References 105 -- Chapter 7 Teamwork 107 -- 7.1 Introduction 107 -- 7.2 Effective Teamwork 109 -- 7.3 Sharing and Assigning Responsibilities 112 -- 7.4 Creating a Manuscript 115 -- 7.5 Recognition and Reward 117 -- 7.6 Leadership 119 -- References 121 -- Chapter 8 Publishing 123 -- 8.1 Introduction 123 -- 8.2 Types of Journals 127 -- 8.3 Journal Editor 129 -- 8.4 Peer Review Process 132 -- 8.5 Assessing Reviewer's Comments 134 -- 8.6 Fraud 136 -- References 137 -- Chapter 9 Technical Presentations 139 -- 9.1 Introduction 139 -- 9.2 Subject Matter 140 -- 9.3 Audience-Technical and Nontechnical 143 -- 9.4 Introduction, Body of the Presentation, and Conclusions 146 -- 9.5 Number of Slides 148 -- 9.6 Character of the Slides 149 -- 9.7 Question Period and Beyond 151 -- 9.8 Practice Talk 152 -- References 154 -- Chapter 10 Other Forms of Writing and Presentation 155 -- 10.1 Introduction 155 -- 10.2 Writing for Trade Journals 156 -- 10.3 Nontechnical Publications 162 -- 10.4 Scientific and Engineering Poster Presentations 165 -- References 169 -- Chapter 11 Correspondence 171 -- 11.1 Introduction 171 -- 11.2 Types of Correspondence 173 -- 11.3 Summary 183 -- References 183.
Summary "Preface writing and verbally presenting data are the most important means for communicating scientific and engineering work and allow readers to appreciate and evaluate the work of other scientists and engineers. Technical writing, as practiced by scientists and engineers, must emerge from organized collection thinking processes that, when converted to writing, illustrate the thoughts of the writers. Scientific and engineering writing must be based on fact and cannot be based on emotions. In fact, scientific and engineering writing is goaldirected and is guided by the writer's goals, which must involve a sense of purpose that has been defined by the writer. No single course of action can prepare the scientist or engineer for every communication situation that s/he will face. Nevertheless, s/he should be able to handle most situations if there is a preliminary consideration of any. One of these constraints is format, and it is necessary to understand that there is no universal format for scientific and engineering writing; the formats used in one organization are not the same formats that scientists and engineers use in a different organization. In addition, the document must appeal to the designated audience and the writer must ensure that the tone is appropriate for the readership. The writer must be respectful and polite to his/her readers, and there must be sufficient information about the problem under investigation. Indeed, there must be enough information in the document for the reader to understand the context of the problem. The way in which many scientists and engineers choose to define a research problem can vary greatly from writer to writer"--Provided by publisher.
Other author Chin Yuen Kee, Zaleena K.
Subject Communication in science.
Communication in engineering.
Technical writing.
ISBN 9781439854792 (paperback)
1439854793 (paperback)