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Book Cover
PRINTED BOOKS
Author Creme, Phyllis, 1942-

Title Writing at university : a guide for students / Phyllis Creme and Mary R. Lea.

Published Maidenhead : Open University Press, 2008.

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM Giblin Eunson  808.042 CREM    DUE 01-09-19
Edition 3rd ed.
Physical description xiii, 218 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Notes Previous ed.: 2003.
Includes index.
Contents 1 You and university writing 1 -- 1.1 Why a book on university writing? 2 -- 1.2 Working with others 3 -- 1.3 You as a writer 4 -- 1.4 Different types of writing 5 -- 1.5 Talking for writing 6 -- 1.6 Getting started, keeping going and dealing with writing blocks 7 -- 1.7 Getting help 9 -- 1.8 A note on word processing 10 -- 1.9 A tour through the rest of the book 10 -- 2.1 Bridging a gap: you and university study 14 -- 2.2 Practice writing 15 -- 2.3 Brainstorming 19 -- 2.4 Generating questions 21 -- 3 Writing for different course 25 -- 3.1 Ways of writing 26 -- 3.2 Different perspectives 26 -- 3.3 Unpacking assignments 28 -- 3.4 Key elements of university writing 32 -- 3.5 Different ways of knowing 33 -- 3.6 Structure and argument 35 -- 3.7 Traditional essay format approach to writing 35 -- 3.8 'building blocks' approach to writing 36 -- 4 Beginning with the title 39 -- 4.1 Keywords 40 -- 4.2 Disadvantages of just looking for keywords 41 -- 4.3 Analysing the assignment 42 -- 5 Reading as part of writing 51 -- 5.1 Approaching reading 52 -- 5.2 Choosing your reading for an assignment 53 -- 5.3 Working with your reading 55 -- 5.4 Thinking about the different texts 57 -- 5.5 Reading and note taking 58 -- 5.6 Making mind maps from reading 59 -- 5.7 Keeping records 61 -- 5.8 Making meaning through reading 63 -- 5.9 Reading your own and other students' work 66 -- 6 Organizing and shaping your writing 71 -- 6.1 Getting the assignment into shape 71 -- 6.2 Different approaches to planning and organizing your writing 72 -- 6.3 Some structures used in university writing 77 -- 6.4 Considering your argument: working out your 'story' and getting your central idea 82 -- 7 Making an argument and persuading your reader 89 -- 7.1 Your reader 90 -- 7.2 What does 'argument' mean? 91 -- 7.3 How students define 'argument' in their subjects 92 -- 7.4 Developing a thesis statement 97 -- 7.5 Working from first thoughts 98 -- 7.6 Making an argument by anticipating questions and objections 100 -- 7.7 Making an argument by looking at two opposing versions 101 -- 7.8 Persuading the reader 104 -- 8 Making good use of your sources 110 -- 8.1 Referencing systems 112 -- 8.2 Referencing websites 113 -- 8.3 Referencing other sources 114 -- 8.4 Recording references 115 -- 8.5 Referencing and plagiarism 115 -- 8.6 Thinking about plagiarism 119 -- 8.7 Using your sources creatively 120 -- 9 Putting yourself into your academic writing 127 -- 9.1 One student's dilemma 128 -- 9.2 'Parrot writing' 129 -- 9.3 Can you be 'original' in your university writing? 131 -- 9.4 Using 'I' in your assignments 132 -- 9.5 From the personal to the academic 133 -- 10 Putting it together 142 -- 10.1 Writing the introduction 143 -- 10.2 Writing the conclusion 147 -- 10.3 Reviewing your work: redrafting and editing 150 -- 10.4 Editing for the reader 151 -- 10.5 Reviewing your work: what are you looking for? 151 -- 10.6 Reorganizing your work: an example 153 -- 11 Completing the assignment and preparing for next time 157 -- 11.1 Grammar and punctuation 157 -- 11.2 Techniques for working on your writing 158 -- 11.3 Handing in your assignment 167 -- 11.4 Learning from feedback: grades and tutors' comments 168 -- 12 Exploring different kinds of writing 173 -- 12.1 Case study: one student's experience 175 -- 12.2 Report writing 184 -- 12.3 Dissertations and projects 187 -- 12.4 Electronic writing 188 -- 12.5 Using the Internet as a resource for writing 190 -- 12.6 Evaluating web resources 191 -- 12.7 Visual and written texts 194 -- 13 Learning journals and reflective writing 195 -- 13.1 Learning journals 196 -- 13.2 Reflecting on practical work 206 -- 13.3 From journals to reflective essays 207 -- 13.4 'learning cycle' and different kinds of writing 207 -- 13.5 A final reflection 209.
Other author Lea, Mary R. (Mary Rosalind), 1950-
Subject Academic writing -- Technique.
Dissertations, Academic.
ISBN 9780335221165 (paperback)
0335221165 (paperback)