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LEADER 00000cam a2200409 a 4500 
008    070910t20082008nyua     b    001 0 eng   
010    2007037290 
020    9780521882606 |q(hardback) 
035    .b31983583 
040    DLC|beng|cDLC|dDLC|dOrLoB-B 
043    e------ 
050 00 ML240|b.W43 2008 
082 00 780.78|222 
100 1  Weber, William,|d1940-|0http://id.loc.gov/authorities/
       names/n84104449 
245 14 The great transformation of musical taste :|bconcert 
       programming from Haydn to Brahms /|cWilliam Weber. 
264  1 New York, NY :|bCambridge University Press,|c[2008] 
264  4 |c©2008 
300    xv, 334 pages :|billustrations ;|c24 cm 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    unmediated|bn|2rdamedia 
338    volume|bnc|2rdacarrier 
504    Includes bibliographical references (pages 311-319) and 
       index. 
505 0  Pt. I. Miscellany and Collegiality, 1750-1800 -- 1. 
       Concepts and contexts -- 2. Variations on miscellany -- 
       Pt. II. Crisis and Experiment, 1800-1848 -- 3. Musical 
       idealism and the crisis of the old order -- 4. The rise of
       the chamber music concert -- 5. Convention and experiment 
       in benefit and virtuoso concerts -- 6. Toward classical 
       repertory in orchestral concerts -- 7. Promenade concerts:
       rise of the "pops" -- Pt. III. Founding a New Order, 1848-
       1875 -- 8. Classical music achieves hegemony -- 9. Vocal 
       music for the general public -- Epilogue: the state of the
       musical community in 1914. 
520 1  "Grounded in knowledge of thousands of programs, this book
       examines how musical life in London, Paris, Leipzig, 
       Vienna, Boston, and other cities underwent a fundamental 
       transformation in relationship with movements in European 
       political life. William Weber traces how musical taste 
       evolved in European concert programs from 1750 to 1875, as
       separate worlds arose around classical music and popular 
       songs. In 1780 a typical program accommodated a variety of
       tastes through a patterned "miscellany" of genres, held 
       together by diplomatic musicians. This framework began 
       weakening around 1800 as new kinds of music appeared, from
       string quartets to quadrilles to ballads, which could not 
       easily coexist on the same programs. Utopian ideas and 
       extravagant experiments influenced programming as 
       ideological battles were fought over who should govern 
       musical taste. More than a hundred illustrations or 
       transcriptions of programs enable readers to follow 
       Weber's analysis in detail."--BOOK JACKET. 
650  0 Concerts|0http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/
       sh85030620|zEurope|0http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects
       /sh85045631|xHistory|y19th century.|0http://id.loc.gov/
       authorities/subjects/sh2002006167 
650  0 Concerts|0http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/
       sh85030620|zEurope|0http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects
       /sh85045631|xHistory|y18th century.|0http://id.loc.gov/
       authorities/subjects/sh2002006124 
650  0 Music|xSocial aspects|0http://id.loc.gov/authorities/
       subjects/sh85088891|xHistory|y19th century.|0http://
       id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2002006167 
650  0 Music|xSocial aspects|0http://id.loc.gov/authorities/
       subjects/sh85088891|xHistory|y18th century.|0http://
       id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2002006124 
907    .b31983583 
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990    MARCIVE MELB 201906 
990    Uploaded to LA VU-B.D153 03/10/08 aci 
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