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Cover Art
PRINTED BOOKS
Author Snowdon, Brian.

Title Conversations on growth, stability and trade : an historical perspective / Brian Snowdon.

Published Northampton, MA : Edward Elgar Pub., 2002.

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM Bund  339 SNOW {Bund81 20190820}    AVAILABLE
Physical description xvi, 483 pages ; 24 cm
Notes Includes index.
Contents 1 Introduction: the world economy in historical perspective 1 -- 1.1 Three themes: growth, stability and trade 1 -- 1.2 Role of government 5 -- 1.3 Institutions for growth, stability and trade 6 -- 1.4 Market failure 10 -- 1.5 Government failure 11 -- 1.6 'Washington consensus' 12 -- 1.7 Towards a 'post-Washington consensus' 14 -- 1.8 Twentieth-century history as economic history 15 -- 1.9 Alternative measures of progress 17 -- 1.10 In praise of 'historical economics' 23 -- 2 Economic growth and development: a very long-run view 29 -- 2.1 Why is economic growth so important? 29 -- 2.2 Modern economic growth in historical perspective 32 -- 2.3 Extensive, Smithian and Promethean growth 35 -- 2.4 Agriculture and the 'Wealth of Nations' 39 -- 2.5 'Industrial Revolution' 41 -- 2.6 Growth, development and the 'End of History' 47 -- 2.7 From 'Golden Age' to 'slowdown' 57 -- 2.8 Britain's 'relative' economic decline 59 -- 2.9 Can the United States retain its economic leadership? 61 -- 3 Growth theories: old and new 64 -- 3.1 Renaissance of economic growth research 64 -- 3.2 Proximate v. fundamental sources of growth: a 'universal equation' 67 -- 3.3 Three stories of growth 68 -- 3.4 Harrod-Domar growth model 69 -- 3.5 Solow neoclassical growth model 73 -- 3.6 Accounting for the sources of growth 77 -- 3.7 Convergence debate 80 -- 3.8 Beyond the Solow model: endogenous growth theories 86 -- 3.9 A neoclassical revival? 89 -- 3.10 Paul Romer mark I: constant returns to capital accumulation 90 -- 3.11 Paul Romer mark II: the economics of ideas 92 -- 3.12 Focusing on the fundamental causes of growth 96 -- 3.13 Politicisation of growth analysis 97 -- 3.14 Allocation of talent 101 -- 3.15 Role of geography 102 -- 3.16 Ideal conditions for growth and development: rediscovering old truths 104 -- 4 Managing aggregate economic instability: from Keynes to Lucas 106 -- 4.1 Ups and downs of capitalism 106 -- 4.2 'Great Depression' 108 -- 4.3 Causes of the Great Depression 111 -- 4.4 Gold Standard and the Great Depression 112 -- 4.5 Political and human costs of instability 116 -- 4.6 Classical and Keynesian visions 119 -- 4.7 1970s Keynesian crisis 124 -- 4.8 Transforming macroeconomics: the influence of Robert E. Lucas Jr. 130 -- 4.9 New classical real business cycle theory 136 -- 4.10 A Keynesian resurgence? 140 -- 4.11 Searching for a nominal anchor: inflation targeting 142 -- 4.12 Monetary policy for stability: a new Keynesian perspective 148 -- 4.13 Twentieth-century developments in macroeconomics: revolution or evolution? 158 -- 5 International economic integration in the second global age 161 -- 5.1 Whither international economic integration? 161 -- 5.2 Globalisation in history 162 -- 5.3 War, peace, democracy and prosperity 166 -- 5.4 Economic case for an open trading system 169 -- 5.5 Challenges to free trade: protectionism, old and new 174 -- 5.6 Economists v. policy entrepreneurs, politicians and pundits 177 -- 5.7 International financial crises 179 -- 5.8 Regionalism and preferential trade 182 -- 5.9 Trade and economic development 184 -- 5.10 Trade and economic growth 187 -- 5.11 Conclusion: the twenty-first century 191 -- Interviews -- Ben Bernanke (Princeton University, USA) 197 -- Jagdish Bhagwati (Columbia University, USA) 216 -- Alan Blinder (Princeton University, USA) 237 -- Nick Crafts (London School of Economics, UK) 259 -- Bradford DeLong (University of California, Berkeley, USA) 281 -- Barry Eichengreen (University of California, Berkeley, USA) 301 -- Kevin Hoover (University of California, Davis, USA) 320 -- Charles Jones (University of California, Berkeley, USA) 342 -- Christina Romer (University of California, Berkeley, USA) 367 -- Joseph Stiglitz (Columbia University, USA) 387.
Subject Macroeconomics.
Economics -- History.
Economic history.
Economists -- United States -- Interviews.
Economists -- Great Britain -- Interviews.
ISBN 184064995X