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Cover Art
E-RESOURCE
Author Development, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and.

Title Measuring Knowledge Management in the Business Sector : First Steps.

Published Paris : Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, 2004.
©2003.

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM INTERNET resource    AVAILABLE
Physical description 1 online resource (222 pages)
polychrome rdacc
Contents Foreword -- Table of Contents -- Chapter 1. Measurement of KnowledgeManagement Practices -- 1.1.Introduction -- 1.2.Knowledge Management: What is New? -- 1.3. Knowledge Management as a Topic for Empirical Studies: Opening another Black Box -- 1.4. From Good Case Studies to Systematic Surveys -- 1.5. Why, How and So What? -- 1.6. Knowledge Management Surveys -- 1.7. Three Main Tasks of a Knowledge Management Survey -- 1.8. A Brief History of the OECD-Statistics Canada Project and a First Look at the Results -- 1.9. Outline of the Book -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Chapter 2. Managing Knowledge in Practice -- 2.1. Introduction -- Figure 2.1. Growth in Knowledge Management Literature -- 2.2. Key Knowledge Processes -- 2.3. Getting Knowledge Management Started -- 2.4. Limits and Potentials of Technological Solutions -- 2.5. Knowledge Capture -- 2.6. Knowledge Sharing -- 2.7. Auditing and Exploiting Intellectual Capital -- Figure 2.2. Skandia Navigator -- Table 2.1. Examples of Indices in an IC Index Hierarchy -- 2.8. Cross-boundary Knowledge Acquisition and Integration -- 2.9. Conclusions -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Chapter 3. Are we Managing our Knowledge? The Canadian Experience -- 3.1. Highlights -- 3.2. Introduction -- 3.3. Survey Background/Overview -- Table 3.1. Distribution of Weighted Sample by Sub-sector and by Firm Size -- 3.4. Definition of Knowledge Management -- Figure 3.1 Average Number or Knowledge Management Practices in Use by Employment Size Group -- 3.5. Knowledge Management Practices in Use -- Table 3.2. Knowledge Management Practices in Use and the Proportion of them that were Recently Adopted - Users of Knowledge Management Practices -- Table 3.3. Percentage of Firms by Sub-sector that were Capturing and Using Knowledge Obtained from Other Industry Sources - Users of Knowledge Management Practices.
Table 3.4. Percentage of Firms by Sub-sector that Encouraged Experienced Workers to Transfer Their Knowledge to New or Less Experienced Workers - Users of Knowledge Management Practices -- 3.6. Reasons Why Knowledge Management Practices Were Adopted -- Table 3.5. Reasons for Using Knowledge Management Practices -- 3.7. Knowledge Management Practices Most Effective for Improving Workers' Skills and Knowledge -- Table 3.6. Effectiveness of Results of Using Knowledge Management Practices -- 3.8. One Quarter of Firms Had Dedicated Budgets for Knowledge Management -- Figure 3.2. Proportion of Firms with Dedicated Spending or Budgets for Knowledge Management Practices by Worker Size Group - Users of Knowledge Management Practices -- Table 3.7. Incentives to Implement Knowledge Management Practices -- Table 3.8. Selected Reasons to Use More or to Implement Knowledge Management Practices by Firm Size - Users of Knowledge Management Practices -- Table 3.9. Selected Reasons to Use More or to Implement Knowledge Management Practices by Sub-sector - Users of Knowledge Management Practices -- 3.9. Knowledge Management - Important Business Practices -- Notes -- Annex 3.1. Non-Users of Knowledge Management Practices -- Table A3.1.1. Percent of Innovative Firms during the Period 1997-99, Survey of Innovation 1999 -- Table A3.1.2. Percentage of Firms Introducing Organisational and Technological Change, Selected Sectors, 1998-2000 -- Annex 3.2. Definitions -- Annex 3.3. Methodological Notes -- Bibliography -- Chapter 4. The Management of Knowledge in German Industry -- 4.1. Introduction: Filling Knowledge Gaps on Industrial Knowledge Management in Germany -- 4.2. Methodology: The Sample -- Table 4.1. Company Sample and Response Rate - Sectoral Distribution -- Figure 4.1. Size Distribution of the Sample (%): Total and Sectors.
4.3. The Employment of KM Practices in German Industry -- Figure 4.2. Average Number of KM Practices Used-size -- Figure 4.3. Average Number of KM Practices Used-sector -- 4.4. What Kind of KM Practices? -- Table 4.2. Percentage of Companies Using Selected KM Practices - Total Sample -- 4.5. The Driving Forces of Knowledge Management: Motivation Patterns in German Industry -- Table 4.3. Motivations to Use KM, Whole Sample -- Table 4.4. Definition of Factors: Motivation for KM (varimax rotated factor loadings) -- Figure 4.4. Importance of Cluster of KM Motives - Size -- Figure 4.5. Importance of Cluster of KM Motives - Sectors -- 4.6. Effects of Knowledge Management -- Table 4.5. Effects of KM - Whole Sample -- Figure 4.6. Cluster of KM Effects - Size -- Figure 4.7. Cluster of KM Effects - Sectors -- 4.7. The Institutionalisation of KM and its Meaning for the Use of Knowledge Management -- Figure 4.8. Institutionalisation of KM -- 4.8. Knowledge Management and its Role within Innovation Management -- Table 4.6. Importance of Reasons to Capture External (Technological) Knowledge - Mean Values -- Table 4.7. Importance of Obstacles to Capture and Use of External Technological Knowledge - Mean Values -- 4.9. Concluding Summary: Only First Steps towards Filled Gaps -- Notes -- Annex 4.1. Non-response -- Table A4.1.1. Non-response Analysis, N=410 -- Annex 4.2. Components Factor Analysis Motivation -- Bibliography -- Chapter 5. The Promotion and Implementation of Knowledge Management - A Danish Contribution -- 5.1. Introduction -- 5.2. Some Overall Results -- Figure 5.1. Suggested Levels of Diffusion in Knowledge Management -- Figure 5.2. Practices Used Under the Heading "Training and Mentoring" -- Figure 5.3. Practices Used Under the Heading "Communications" -- Table 5.1. Practices Used Under the Heading "Policies and Strategies".
5.3. Measuring, Controlling and Documenting Effectiveness -- Figure 5.4. Practices Used Under the Heading "Incentives" -- 5.4. Inspiration for Top Managers - Content and Process -- Figure 5.5. External Sources Triggering the Implementation of Knowledge Management Practices -- Table 5.2. Practices Used Under the Heading "Knowledge Capture and Acquisition" -- Table 5.3. Practices Used Under the Heading "Training and Mentoring" -- 5.5. What Can Top Management Expect from the Environment? -- 5.6. Further Research -- Notes -- Annex 5.1. Methodology of the Danish Pilot Study -- Table A5.1.1. Distribution in the pilot survey by number of employees -- Table A5.1.2. Distribution in the pilot survey by sector -- Figure A5.1.1. Sequence chart of the Danish pilot study -- Annex 5.2. Which practices has the greatest results? -- Figure A5.2.1. Result achieved from the Knowledge Management activities -- Table A5.2.1. The explanatory effect of results on level of activity -- Notes of the Annexes -- Bibliography -- Chapter 6. Knowledge Management, Innovation and Productivity: A Firm Level Exploration Based on French Manufacturing CIS3 Data -- 6.1. Introduction -- Box 6.1 - Knowledge Management in the Third Community Innovation Survey (CIS3) for French manufacturing -- 6.2. Diffusion of Knowledge Management -- Figure 6.1. Diffusion of Knowledge Management Practices by Firm Size -- Figure 6.2. Diffusion of Knowledge Management Practices by Technology Intensive Industries -- Table 6.1. Diffusion of Knowledge Management Practices, according to the Adoption of New Management Methods, to R&D and Innovating Activities, to Internet and ICT Use -- 6.3. Complementarity of Knowledge Management Practices -- Figure 6.3. Complementarity of Knowledge Management Practices -- 6.4. Knowledge Management and Innovation.
Figure 6.4. Knowledge Management Intensity by Size and Technology Intensive Industries -- Table 6.2. Estimated Impacts of Knowledge Management on Firm Innovation and Productivity, Controlling for Other Relevant Factors -- Table 6.3. Tests of the Regression Model with KM Intensity against Models with Four KM Intensity Binary Indicators, and the Four KM Practices Binary Indicators Alone or Fully Interacted -- Figure 6.5. Estimated Impacts of Knowledge Management Practices on Innovation Performance, "all else equal" -- 6.5. Knowledge Management and Productivity -- Figure 6.6. Impacts of Knowledge Management Practices on Labour Productivity, "all other things being equal" -- 6.6. Conclusion -- Notes -- Annex 6.1. -- Table A6.1.1. Diffusion of Knowledge Management Practices by Industry in Manufacturing -- Table A6.1.2. Complementarity of Knowledge Management Practices -- Table A6.1.3. Correlations between Knowledge Management Practices -- Table A6.1.4. Descriptive statistics -- Table A6.1.5. Estimated Impacts of Knowledge Management Intensity, R&D Intensity and Other Control Variables on Firm Innovation and Productivity -- Bibliography -- Chapter 7. Knowledge Management: Size Matters -- 7.1. Introduction -- Figure 7.1. Firm Size Composition of KM Practitioners in Canada - KMPS 2001 -- 7.2. Practices -- Figure 7.2. Average Number of KM Practices in Use by Firm Size - KMPS 2001 -- Table 7.1. Use of Knowledge Management Practices by Micro Practitioners -- Table 7.2. Use of Knowledge Management Practices by Large Practitioners -- 7.3. Reasons for Using KM Practices -- Table 7.3. Reasons why Large Practitioners Used Knowledge Management Practices -- 7.4. Results of Using KM Practices -- Table 7.4. Results of Using Knowledge Management Practices, Micro Practitioners -- Table 7.5. Results of Using Knowledge Management Practices, Large Practitioners.
7.5. Incentives to Use KM.
Summary Knowledge management involves any activity related to the capture, use and sharing of knowledge by an organisation. Evidence shows that these practices are being used more and more frequently and that their impact on innovation and other aspects of corporate performance is far from negligible.
Notes Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Local Note Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2018. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subject Information society -- Cross-cultural studies.
Knowledge management -- Cross-cultural studies.
Knowledge management -- Measurement.
Knowledge management.
Electronic books.
ISBN 9789264100282 (electronic bk.)
9789264100268