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Cover Art
PRINTED BOOKS
Author Lee, Kenneth K.

Title Huddled masses, muddled laws : why contemporary immigration policy fails to reflect public opinion / Kenneth K. Lee.

Published Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1998.

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM Bail  325.73 LEE    AVAILABLE
Physical description xii, 168 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (pages [157]-164) and index.
Contents Ch. 1. Introduction: The Immigration Puzzle -- Ch. 2. Public Opinion: What Americans Think about Immigration -- Ch. 3. A History of Ambivalence -- Ch. 4. How Illegal Immigration Dwarfed Legal Immigration -- Ch. 5. The Elite and the State: Common Explanations for the Immigration Puzzle -- Ch. 6. The Left-Right Alliance -- Ch. 7. Insulation from Public Opinion: The Politics of Family and Illegal Immigration -- Ch. 8. Prospects for the Future.
Summary In 1997 the United States accepted more legal immigrants than all other countries combined. This large influx of newcomers, however, has alarmed many Americans. Immigration is a controversial issue because it intersects with the most contentious issues of our time: multiculturalism, bilingualism, unemployment, crime, etc. Opinion polls since 1965 show that a strong majority want to reduce immigration. Yet our government has refused to respond to the public's wish. Kenneth Lee explains why recent immigration policy has failed to reflect the public opinion by approaching the question from a broad, historical outlook, and from a focused, contemporary perspective.
Subject Immigrants -- United States -- Public opinion.
Public opinion -- United States.
United States -- Emigration and immigration -- Government policy.
United States -- Emigration and immigration -- Public opinion.
ISBN 0275962725 (alk. paper)