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Cover Art
PRINTED BOOKS
Author Steinberg, Dave S., 1923-

Title Vibration analysis for electronic equipment / Dave S. Steinberg.

Published New York ; Chichester : John Wiley & Sons, [2000]
©2000

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM Store Engin  621.381 STEI    AVAILABLE
Edition 3rd ed.
Physical description xx, 414 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Notes "A Wiley-Interscience publication.".
Previous ed.: 1988.
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents 1.1 Vibration Sources 1 -- 1.3 Vibration Representation 3 -- 1.4 Degrees of Freedom 3 -- 1.5 Vibration Modes 5 -- 1.6 Vibration Nodes 5 -- 1.7 Coupled Modes 6 -- 1.8 Fasteners 7 -- 1.9 Electronic Equipment for Airplanes and Missiles 10 -- 1.10 Electronic Equipment for Ships and Submarines 13 -- 1.11 Electronic Equipment for Automobiles, Trucks, and Trains 15 -- 1.12 Electronics for Oil Drilling Equipment 16 -- 1.13 Electronics for Computers, Communication, and Entertainment 16 -- 2 Vibrations of Simple Electronic Systems 17 -- 2.1 Single Spring-Mass System Without Damping 17 -- 2.2 Single-Degree-of-Freedom Torsional Systems 21 -- 2.3 Springs in Series and Parallel 23 -- 2.4 Relation of Frequency and Acceleration to Displacement 26 -- 2.5 Forced Vibrations with Viscous Damping 30 -- 2.6 Transmissibility as a Function of Frequency 34 -- 2.7 Multiple Spring--Mass Systems Without Damping 36 -- 3 Component Lead Wire and Solder Joint Vibration Fatigue Life 39 -- 3.2 Vibration Problems with Components Mounted High Above the PCB 39 -- 3.3 Vibration Fatigue Life in Solder Joints of a TO-5 Transistor 43 -- 3.4 Recommendations to Fix the Wire Vibration Problem 45 -- 3.5 Dynamic Forces Developed in Transformer Wires During Vibration 46 -- 3.6 Relative Displacements Between PCB and Component Produce Lead Wire Strain 49 -- 4 Beam Structures for Electronic Subassemblies 56 -- 4.1 Natural Frequency of a Uniform Beam 56 -- 4.2 Nonuniform Cross Sections 64 -- 4.3 Composite Beams 69 -- 5 Component Lead Wires as Bents, Frames, and Arcs 75 -- 5.1 Electronic Components Mounted on Circuit Boards 75 -- 5.2 Bent with a Lateral Load--Hinged Ends 77 -- 5.3 Strain Energy--Bent with Hinged Ends 80 -- 5.4 Strain Energy--Bent with Fixed Ends 83 -- 5.5 Strain Energy--Circular Arc with Hinged Ends 90 -- 5.6 Strain Energy--Circular Arc with Fixed Ends 92 -- 5.7 Strain Energy--Circular Arcs for Lead Wire Strain Relief 94 -- 6 Printed Circuit Boards and Flat Plates 103 -- 6.1 Various Types of Printed Circuit Boards 103 -- 6.2 Changes in Circuit Board Edge Conditions 106 -- 6.3 Estimating the Transmissibility of a Printed Circuit Board 108 -- 6.4 Natural Frequency Using a Trigonometric Series 111 -- 6.5 Natural Frequency Using a Polynomial Series 116 -- 6.6 Natural Frequency Equations Derived Using the Rayleigh Method 122 -- 6.7 Dynamic Stresses in the Circuit Board 127 -- 6.8 Ribs on Printed Circuit Boards 132 -- 6.9 Ribs Fastened to Circuit Boards with Screws 137 -- 6.10 Printed Circuit Boards With Ribs in Two Directions 141 -- 6.11 Proper Use of Ribs to Stiffen Plates and Circuit Boards 141 -- 6.12 Quick Way to Estimate the Required Rib Spacing for Circuit Boards 142 -- 6.13 Natural Frequencies for Different PCB Shapes with Different Supports 144 -- 7 Octave Rule, Snubbing, and Damping to Increase the PCB Fatigue Life 150 -- 7.1 Dynamic Coupling Between the PCBs and Their Support Structures 150 -- 7.2 Effects of Loose Edge Guides on Plug-in Type PCBs 154 -- 7.3 Description of Dynamic Computer Study for the Octave Rule 154 -- 7.4 Forward Octave Rule Always Works 155 -- 7.5 Reverse Octave Rule Must Have Lightweight PCBs 155 -- 7.6 Proposed Corrective Action for Relays 157 -- 7.7 Using Snubbers to Reduce PCB Displacements and Stresses 159 -- 7.8 Controlling the PCB Transmissibility with Damping 162 -- 7.9 Properties of Material Damping 162 -- 7.10 Constrained Layer Damping with Viscoelastic Materials 163 -- 7.11 Why Stiffening Ribs on PCBs are Often Better than Damping 164 -- 7.12 Problems with PCB Viscoelastic Dampers 164 -- 8 Preventing Sinusoidal Vibration Failures in Electronic Equipment 166 -- 8.2 Estimating the Vibration Fatigue Life 167 -- 8.3 Electronic Component Lead Wire Strain Relief 169 -- 8.4 Designing PCBs for Sinusoidal Vibration Environments 171 -- 8.5 How Location and Orientation of Component on PCB Affect Life 175 -- 8.6 How Wedge Clamps Affect the PCB Resonant Frequency 177 -- 8.7 Effects of Loose PCB Side Edge Guides 182 -- 8.8 Sine Sweep Through a Resonance 185 -- 9 Designing Electronics for Random Vibration 188 -- 9.2 Basic Failure Modes in Random Vibration 188 -- 9.3 Characteristics of Random Vibration 189 -- 9.4 Differences Between Sinusoidal and Random Vibrations 190 -- 9.5 Random Vibration Input Curves 192 -- 9.6 Random Vibration Units 193 -- 9.7 Shaped Random Vibration Input Curves 194 -- 9.8 Relation Between Decibels and Slope 197 -- 9.9 Integration Method for Obtaining the Area Under a PSD Curve 198 -- 9.10 Finding Points on the PSD Curve 200 -- 9.11 Using Basic Logarithms to Find Points on the PSD Curve 201 -- 9.12 Probability Distribution Functions 202 -- 9.13 Gaussian or Normal Distribution Curve 202 -- 9.14 Correlating Random Vibration Failures Using the Three-Band Technique 204 -- 9.15 Rayleigh Distribution Function 205 -- 9.16 Response of a Single-Degree-of-Freedom System to Random Vibration 206 -- 9.17 How PCBs Respond to Random Vibration 214 -- 9.18 Designing PCBs for Random Vibration Environments 215 -- 9.19 Effects of Relative Motion on Component Fatigue Life 220 -- 9.20 It's the Input PSD that Counts, Not the Input RMS Acceleration 222 -- 9.21 Connector Wear and Surface Fretting Corrosion 223 -- 9.22 Multiple-Degree-of-Freedom Systems 224 -- 9.23 Octave Rule for Random Vibration 225 -- 9.24 Determining the Number of Positive Zero Crossings 231 -- 10 Acoustic Noise Effects on Electronics 234 -- 10.2 Microphonic Effects in Electronic Equipment 235 -- 10.3 Methods for Generating Acoustic Noise Tests 236 -- 10.4 One-Third Octave Bandwidth 238 -- 10.5 Determining the Sound Pressure Spectral Density 238 -- 10.6 Sound Pressure Response to Acoustic Noise Excitation 239 -- 10.7 Determining the Sound Acceleration Spectral Density 245 -- 11 Designing Electronics for Shock Environments 248 -- 11.2 Specifying the Shock Environment 249 -- 11.3 Pulse Shock 251 -- 11.4 Half-Sine Shock Pulse for Zero Rebound and Full Rebound 252 -- 11.5 Response of Electronic Structures to Shock Pulses 257 -- 11.6 Response of a Simple System to Various Shock Pulses 258 -- 11.7 How PCBs Respond to Shock Pulses 260 -- 11.8 Determining the Desired PCB Resonant Frequency for Shock 260 -- 11.9 Response of PCB to Other Shock Pulses 264 -- 11.10 Equivalent Shock Pulse 269 -- 11.11 Low Values of the Frequency Ratio R 274 -- 11.12 Shock Isolators 275 -- 11.13 Information Required for Shock Isolators 277 -- 11.14 Ringing Effects in Systems with Light Damping 281 -- 11.15 How Two-Degree-of-Freedom Systems Respond to Shock 282 -- 11.16 Octave Rule for Shock 284 -- 11.17 Velocity Shock 285 -- 11.18 Nonlinear Velocity Shock 286 -- 11.19 Shock Response Spectrum 288 -- 11.20 How Chassis and PCBs Respond to Shock 291 -- 11.21 How Pyrotechnic Shock Can Affect Electronic Components 296 -- 12 Design and Analysis of Electronic Boxes 300 -- 12.2 Different Types of Mounts 300 -- 12.3 Preliminary Dynamic Analysis 303 -- 12.4 Bolted Covers 305 -- 12.5 Coupled Modes 308 -- 12.6 Dynamic Loads in a Chassis 311 -- 12.7 Bending Stresses in the Chassis 316 -- 12.8 Buckling Stress Ratio for Bending 318 -- 12.9 Torsional Stresses in the Chassis 320 -- 12.10 Buckling Stress Ratio for Shear 324 -- 12.11 Margin of Safety for Buckling 325 -- 12.12 Center-of-Gravity Mount 326 -- 12.13 Simpler Method for Obtaining Dynamic Forces and Stresses on a Chassis 328 -- 13 Effects of Manufacturing Methods on the Reliability of Electronics 330 -- 13.2 Typical Tolerances in Electronic Components and Lead Wires 331 -- 13.3 Problems Associated with Tolerances on PCB Thickness 333 -- 13.4 Effects of Poor Bonding Methods on Structural Stiffness 334 -- 13.5 Soldering Small Axial Leaded Components on Through-Hole PCBs 335 -- 13.6 Areas Where Poor Manufacturing Methods Have Been Known to Cause Problems 336 -- 13.7 Avionic Integrity Program and Automotive Integrity Program (AVIP) 338 -- 13.8 Basic Philosophy for Performing an AVIP Analysis 340 -- 13.9 Different Perspectives of Reliability 343 -- 14 Vibration Fixtures and Vibration Testing 346 -- 14.1 Vibration Simulation
Equipment 346 -- 14.2 Mounting the Vibration Machine 347 -- 14.3 Vibration Test Fixtures 347 -- 14.4 Basic Fixture Design Considerations 348 -- 14.5 Effective Spring Rates for Bolts 350 -- 14.6 Bolt Preload Torque 352 -- 14.7 Rocking Modes and Overturning Moments 353 -- 14.8 Oil-Film Slider Tables 355 -- 14.9 Vibration Fixture Counterweights 356 -- 14.10 A Summary for Good Fixture Design 357 -- 14.11 Suspension Systems 357 -- 14.12 Mechanical Fuses 358 --
14.13 Distinguishing Bending Modes from Rocking Modes 359 -- 14.14 Push-Bar Couplings 360 -- 14.15 Slider Plate Longitudinal Resonance 364 -- 14.16 Acceleration Force Capability of Shaker 365 -- 14.17 Positioning the Servo-Control Accelerometer 366 -- 14.18 More Accurate Method for Estimating the Transmissibility Q in Structures 367 -- Bibration Testing Case Histories 369 -- 14.19 Cross-Coupling Effects in Vibration Test Fixtures 369 -- 14.20 Progressive Vibration Shear Failures in Bolted Structures 370 -- 14.21 Vibration Push-Bar Couplers with Bolts Loaded in Shear 371 -- 14.22 Bolting PCB Centers Together to Improve Their Vibration Fatigue Life 373 -- 14.23 Vibration Failures Caused by Careless Manufacturing Methods 375 -- 14.24 Alleged Vibration Failure that was Really Caused by Dropping a Large Chassis 376 -- 14.25 Methods for Increasing the Vibration and Shock Capability on Existing Systems 377 -- 15 Environmental Stress Screening for Electronic Equipment (ESSEE) 379 -- 15.2 Environmental Stress Screening Philosophy 379 -- 15.3 Screening Environments 381 -- 15.4 Things an Acceptable Screen Are Expected to Do 383 -- 15.5 Things an Acceptable Screen Are Not Expected to Do 383 -- 15.6 To Screen or Not to Screen, That is the Problem 384 -- 15.7 Preparations Prior to the Start of a Screening Program 384 -- 15.8 Combined Thermal Cycling, Random Vibration, and Electrical Operation 387 -- 15.9 Separate Thermal Cycling, Random Vibration, and Electrical Operation 389 -- 15.10 Importance of the Screening Environment Sequence 389 -- 15.11 How Damage Can Be Developed in a Thermal Cycling Screen 390 -- 15.12 Estimating the Amount of Fatigue Life Used Up in a Random Vibration Screen 392.
Summary This book deals with the analysis of various types of vibration environments that can lead to the failure of electronic systems or components.
Subject Electronic apparatus and appliances -- Vibration.
ISBN 047137685X No price
047137685X