My Library

University LibraryCatalogue

For faster,
simpler
access.
Use Lean
Library.
Get it now
Don't show me again
     
Result Page: Previous Next
Can't find that book? Try BONUS+
 
Look for full text

Search Discovery

Search CARM Centre Catalogue

Search Trove

Add record to RefWorks

Cover Art
PRINTED BOOKS
Author Macksey, Kenneth.

Title The searchers : radio intercept in two world wars / Kenneth Macksey.

Published London : Cassell Military, 2003.

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM Bail  355.34320904 MACK    AVAILABLE
Physical description 288 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24cm
Contents 1 Signal Intelligence Organisation, UK, January 1941 13 -- 2 Radio intercept routes to and through GC and CS, c. 1943 14 -- 3 Allied intercept stations and main Axis transmitters, Mediterranean and Middle East, c. 1942 15 -- 4 Wehrmacht signals routes, 1942 16 -- 5 Middle East Y Organisation, 1942-5 17 -- 6 Organisation of Hut 3, GC and CS, August 1943 18 -- 7 Organisation of Air Section, GC and CS, July 1944 18 -- 8 Allied Signal Intelligence stations, Far East, 1941-5 19 -- 9 Signal Intelligence Organisation, SEAC and India, April 1944 20 -- 10 Allied land intercept stations, Pacific, 1941-5 21 -- 1 Birth of Radio 23 -- 2 First Radio Conflict 28 -- 3 Shaping a New System 38 -- 4 A New Freemasonry 51 -- 5 Progress to Calamity 62 -- 6 Foundations 70 -- 7 Alone and Under Siege 86 -- 8 Mediterranean Imbroglio 96 -- 9 Towards Armageddon 105 -- 10 Global War 116 -- 11 Crisis at Bletchley Park 128 -- 12 Point of Balance 135 -- 13 Rebound in 1942 157 -- 14 Flickering Torch 166 -- 15 Symbol Effect 172 -- 16 General Advance 186 -- 17 Misconceptions Exposed 194 -- 18 Attrition of Japan 204 -- 19 Overture to Overlord 214 -- 20 Normandy to Arnhem 227 -- 21 Looming Silence 237 -- 22 Dogfights 251 -- 23 Ultimate Climax 265 -- 24 Endless Story 276.
Summary The ability to transmit military information by radio, first made practical at the beginning of the twentieth century, brought immediate advantage over a potential enemy. But radio signals are open to all to intercept - there were fourteen radio intercept stations in Britain by 1914 - and their secrecy thus compromised. Signals had to be encrypted, and to be of any use in time of war to an intercepting enemy they had to be deciphered, and quickly. In both world wars, searching for enemy radio traffic was a top priority. The Germans used radio intercepts to wipe out a Russian invasion in 1914; at the same time, French listening stations in the Eiffel Tower enabled Allied forces to defeat the German attack on France. Radio warfare played a key role in the Battle of Britain in 1940, and in the war against the U-boats in the Atlantic. Kenneth Macksey's fascinating book reveals how radio technology shaped the course of the Second World War. This is the story, not of the codebreakers, but of the Y Service, the searchers who made their vital work possible: men and women with headphones clamped to their ears who for hours on end searched the radio bands, sometimes in dangerous places, in order to overhear the enemy. Their achievements were made possible by brilliantly clever inventors and technologists, constantly pushing forward the frontiers of knowledge. The intelligence derived from their work influenced, often determined, the course of battle in the global war against the Germans, Italians and Japanese, and Kenneth Macksey shows just how vital were these unsung heroes who spent their war in the shadows.
Subject Radio, Military -- History.
World War, 1939-1945 -- Electronic intelligence.
World War, 1914-1918 -- Electronic intelligence.
ISBN 0304365459 : £20.00