My Library

University LibraryCatalogue

     
Limit search to items available for borrowing or consultation
Result Page: Previous Next
Can't find that book? Try BONUS+
 
Look for full text

Search Discovery

Search CARM Centre Catalogue

Search Trove

Add record to RefWorks

Cover Art
PRINTED BOOKS
Author Elleman, Bruce A., 1959-

Title Wilson and China : a revised history of the Shandong question / Bruce A. Elleman.

Published Armonk, N.Y. : M.E. Sharpe, [2002]
©2002

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM Store  327.51052 ELLE MF29    AVAILABLE
Physical description xviii, 227 pages : maps ; 24 cm
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (pages 211-219) and index.
Contents 1. Diplomatic Situation Prior to the Paris Peace Conference 7 -- German Diplomatic Position in Shandong 8 -- Japan Declares War on Germany 11 -- Strategic and Military Importance of the Shandong Concession 13 -- Foreign Policy Issues Regarding the Shandong Concession 14 -- Japan Presents the Twenty-one Demands 15 -- Japanese Ultimatum 18 -- China Joins the War Against Germany 21 -- 1918 Secret Sino-Japanese Agreements 24 -- 2. Chinese Delegation's Proposals to the Paris Peace Conference 33 -- Members of the Chinese Delegation 34 -- Wellington Koo and President Woodrow Wilson 36 -- Chinese Delegation's Proposals to Paris 39 -- Wellington Koo and the Shandong Question 41 -- Chinese Delegation's March and April Declarations 44 -- Direct or Indirect Restitution of Shandong 46 -- 3. Japanese Delegation's Proposals to the Paris Peace Conference 53 -- Japanese Delegation and its Proposals 54 -- American Delegation's Opening Position on Shandong 56 -- Who Wanted the Secret Agreements Kept Secret? 60 -- Impact of the Secret Agreements on America's Proposals 64 -- Japanese Delegation's April 1919 Proposals 66 -- 4. President Wilson's Compromise Proposal 73 -- American Delegation and its Proposals 75 -- Big Three's Negotiations with the Chinese Delegation 77 -- Big Three's Negotiations with the Japanese Delegation 80 -- Wilson's Rationale Behind this Compromise Solution 84 -- Impact of Wilson's Compromise 86 -- 5. Myth of Woodrow Wilson's Betrayal 93 -- Importance of "Face" in China 94 -- Chinese Diplomatic Reaction to the Shandong Resolutions 97 -- Japanese Diplomatic Reaction to the Shandong Resolutions 98 -- Shandong Resolutions, the May Fourth Movement, and Wilson 103 -- Liang Qichao's Interpretation of the Shandong Resolutions 105 -- 6. Wilson's Failed Attempts to Secure a Japanese Statement of Intent 111 -- America Decides to Obtain a Japanese Statement of Intent 112 -- Chinese Delegation Fails to Sign on a Provisional Basis 114 -- Creation of a Draft Statement of Intent 118 -- Plans to Issue a Big Three Statement of Intent 122 -- Shandong and the League of Nations 124 -- 7. Shandong and the Origins of the Chinese Communist Party 135 -- May Fourth Movement and Chinese Radicalization 136 -- Karakhan Manifesto and the Birth of Chinese Communism 138 -- Shandong Resolution's Impact on Li Dazhao and Chen Duxiu 140 -- Shandong and the Founding of the Chinese Communist Party 145 -- Shandong and the United Front Strategy 148 -- 8. Myth of Soviet Equal Treatment of China 155 -- Shandong and the Diplomatic Legacy of Versailles 156 -- 1921-1922 Washington Conference 160 -- Soviet Diplomacy and the United Front Strategy 162 -- Lev Karakhan's Secret Diplomacy and the CER 164 -- 1925 Restoration of Soviet-Japanese Diplomatic Relations 165 -- Lev Karakhan and the Twenty-one Demands 168 -- Epilogue: The Impact of the Shandong Question 175 -- Appendix A 27 January 1919 Notes 183 -- Appendix B 28 January 1919 Notes 187 -- Appendix C 22 April 1919 Notes 195.
Summary Drawing on sources in Japanese, Chinese, and American archives and libraries, this book reassesses another facet of Woodrow Wilson's agenda at the 1919 Paris Peace Conference at the end of World War I. Breaking with accepted scholarly opinions, the author argues that Wilson did not "betray" China, as many Chinese and Western scholars have charged; rather, Wilson successfully negotiated a compromise with the Japanese to ensure that China's sovereignty would be respected in Shandong Province. Rejecting the compromise, Chinese negotiators refused to sign the Treaty of Versailles, creating conditions for the Soviet Union's entry into China and its later influence over the course of the Chinese revolution.
Subject China -- Foreign relations -- Japan.
Japan -- Foreign relations -- China.
China -- Foreign relations -- 1912-1949.
Shandong Sheng (China) -- History.
Variant Title Revised history of the Shandong question.
ISBN 0765610507 (alk. paper)