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Cover Art
PRINTED BOOKS
Author McCormac, Jack C.

Title Design of reinforced concrete / Jack C. McCormac.

Published New York : Wiley, [2001]
©2001

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM ERC  624.18341 MCCO    AVAILABLE
Edition 5th ed.
Physical description xiii, 738 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm + 1 computer laser optical disc (4 3/4 in.)
Notes Includes index.
Contents 1.1 Concrete and Reinforced Concrete 1 -- 1.2 Advantages of Reinforced Concrete as a Structural Material 1 -- 1.3 Disadvantages of Reinforced Concrete as a Structural Material 3 -- 1.4 Historical Background 4 -- 1.5 Comparison of Reinforced Concrete and Structural Steel for Buildings and Bridges 6 -- 1.6 Compatibility of Concrete and Steel 7 -- 1.7 Design Codes 8 -- 1.8 SI Units and Shaded Areas 8 -- 1.9 Types of Portland Cement 9 -- 1.10 Admixtures 10 -- 1.11 Properties of Reinforced Concrete 11 -- 1.12 Aggregates 18 -- 1.13 High-Strength Concretes 19 -- 1.14 Fiber-Reinforced Concretes 21 -- 1.15 Reinforcing Steel 22 -- 1.16 Grades of Reinforcing Steel 24 -- 1.17 SI Bar Sizes and Material Strengths 25 -- 1.18 Corrosive Environments 26 -- 1.19 Identifying Marks on Reinforcing Bars 26 -- 1.20 Introduction to Loads 28 -- 1.21 Dead Loads 28 -- 1.22 Live Loads 29 -- 1.23 Environmental Loads 30 -- 1.24 Selection of Design Loads 32 -- 1.25 Calculation Accuracy 34 -- 1.26 Impact of Computers on Reinforced Concrete Design 34 -- Chapter 2 Flexural Analysis of Beams 35 -- 2.2 Cracking Moment 39 -- 2.3 Elastic Stresses--Concrete Cracked 41 -- 2.4 Ultimate or Nominal Flexural Moments 46 -- 2.5 Example Problem Using SI Units 49 -- 2.6 CONCAD 50 -- Chapter 3 Design of Rectangular Beams and One-Way Slabs 67 -- 3.1 Design Methods 67 -- 3.2 Advantages of Strength Design 68 -- 3.3 Structural Safety 70 -- 3.4 Load Factors 70 -- 3.5 Strength Reduction Factors 71 -- 3.6 Underreinforced and Overreinforced Beams 71 -- 3.7 Derivation of Beam Expressions 72 -- 3.8 Maximum Permissible Steel Percentage 75 -- 3.9 Minimum Percentage of Steel 77 -- 3.10 Flexural Strength Example 78 -- 3.11 Design of Rectangular Beams 81 -- 3.12 Beam Design Examples 84 -- 3.13 Miscellaneous Beam Considerations 87 -- 3.14 Determining Steel Area when Beam Dimensions are Predetermined 90 -- 3.15 Bundled Bars 92 -- 3.16 One-Way Slabs 92 -- 3.17 Cantilever Beams and Continuous Beams 96 -- 3.18 SI Example 97 -- 3.19 Computer Example 98 -- Chapter 4 Analysis and Design of t Beams and Doubly Reinforced Beams 109 -- 4.1 T Beams 109 -- 4.2 Analysis of T Beams 112 -- 4.3 Another Method for Analyzing T Beams 116 -- 4.4 Design of T Beams 118 -- 4.5 Design of T Beams for Negative Moments 124 -- 4.6 L Shaped Beams 127 -- 4.7 Compression Steel 127 -- 4.8 Design of Doubly Reinforced Beams 133 -- 4.9 SI Examples 136 -- 4.10 Computer Examples 138 -- Chapter 5 Serviceability 155 -- 5.2 Importance of Deflections 156 -- 5.3 Control of Deflections 157 -- 5.4 Calculation of Deflections 158 -- 5.5 Effective Moments of Inertia 160 -- 5.6 Long-Term Deflections 163 -- 5.7 Simple-Beam Deflections 165 -- 5.8 Continuous-Beam Deflections 167 -- 5.9 Types of Cracks 172 -- 5.10 Control of Flexural Cracks 174 -- 5.11 ACI Code Provisions Concerning Cracks 178 -- 5.12 Miscellaneous Cracks 179 -- 5.13 SI Example 179 -- Chapter 6 Bond, Development Lengths, and Splices 187 -- 6.1 Cutting Off or Bending Bars 187 -- 6.2 Bond Stresses 191 -- 6.3 Development Lengths for Tension Reinforcing 193 -- 6.4 Development Lengths for Bundled Bars 202 -- 6.5 Hooks 203 -- 6.6 Development Lengths for Welded Wire Fabric in Tension 208 -- 6.7 Development Lengths for Compression Bars 209 -- 6.8 Critical Sections for Development Length 211 -- 6.9 Effect of Combined Shear and Moment on Development Lengths 211 -- 6.10 Effect of Shape of Moment Diagram on Development Lengths 212 -- 6.11 Cutting Off or Bending Bars (continued) 213 -- 6.12 Bar Splices in Flexural Members 217 -- 6.13 Tension Splices 218 -- 6.14 Compression Splices 219 -- 6.15 SI Example 220 -- 6.16 Computer Example 221 -- Chapter 7 Shear and Diagonal Tension 231 -- 7.2 Shear Stresses in Concrete Beams 231 -- 7.3 Shear Strength of Concrete 233 -- 7.4 Lightweight Concrete 234 -- 7.5 Shear Cracking of Reinforced Concrete Beams 235 -- 7.6 Web Reinforcement 236 -- 7.7 Behavior of Beams with Web Reinforcement 238 -- 7.8 Design for Shear 240 -- 7.9 ACI Code Requirements 242 -- 7.10 Example Shear Design Problems 246 -- 7.11 Economical Spacing of Stirrups 257 -- 7.12 Shear Friction 258 -- 7.13 Shear Strength of Members Subjected to Axial Forces 261 -- 7.14 Shear Design Provisions for Deep Beams 263 -- 7.15 Introductory Comments on Torsion 265 -- 7.16 SI Example 266 -- 7.17 Computer Example 268 -- 8.2 Types of Columns 277 -- 8.3 Axial Load Capacity of Columns 279 -- 8.4 Failure of Tied and Spiral Columns 279 -- 8.5 Code Requirements for Cast-in-Place Columns 283 -- 8.6 Safety Provisions for Columns 285 -- 8.7 Design Formulas 286 -- 8.8 Comments on Economical Column Design 287 -- 8.9 Design of Axially Loaded Columns 288 -- 8.10 SI Example 291 -- 8.11 Design of Reinforced Concrete Columns Using the Alternate Design Method 292 -- 8.12 Computer Example 292 -- Chapter 9 Design of Short Columns Subject to Axial Load and Bending 295 -- 9.1 Axial Load and Bending 295 -- 9.2 Plastic Centroid 297 -- 9.3 Development of Interaction Diagrams 299 -- 9.4 Use of Interaction Diagrams 305 -- 9.5 Code Modifications of Column Interaction Diagrams 308 -- 9.6 Analysis of Eccentrically Loaded Columns Using Interaction Diagrams 310 -- 9.7 Design of Eccentrically Loaded Columns Using Interaction Diagrams 314 -- 9.8 Shear in Columns 317 -- 9.9 Biaxial Bending 317 -- 9.10 Computer Example 324 -- Chapter 10 Slender Columns 337 -- 10.2 Non-Sway and Sway Frames 337 -- 10.3 Slenderness Effects 338 -- 10.4 Determining K Factors with Alignment Charts 341 -- 10.5 Determining K Factors with Equations 343 -- 10.6 First-Order Analyses Using Special Member Properties 345 -- 10.7 Slender Columns in Non-Sway or Braced Frames 345 -- 10.8 Magnification of Column Moments in Non-Sway Frames 348 -- 10.9 Magnification of Column Moments in Sway Frames 353 -- 10.10 Analysis of Sway Frames 357 -- Chapter 11 Footings 367 -- 11.2 Types of Footings 368 -- 11.3 Actual Soil Pressures 370 -- 11.4 Allowable Soil Pressures 370 -- 11.5 Design of Wall Footings 373 -- 11.6 Design of Square Isolated Footings 378 -- 11.7 Footings Supporting Round or Regular Polygon-Shaped Columns 385 -- 11.8 Load Transfer from Columns to Footings 385 -- 11.9 Rectangular Isolated Footings 389 -- 11.10 Combined Footings 393 -- 11.11 Footing Design for Equal Settlements 399 -- 11.12 Footings Subjected to Lateral Moments 400 -- 11.13 Transfer of Horizontal Forces 403 -- 11.14 Plain Concrete Footings 404 -- 11.15 SI Example 407 -- 11.16 Computer Examples 408 -- Chapter 12 Retaining Walls 417 -- 12.2 Types of Retaining Walls 417 -- 12.3 Drainage 420 -- 12.4 Failures of Retaining Walls 422 -- 12.5 Lateral Pressures on Retaining Walls 422 -- 12.6 Footing Soil Pressures 428 -- 12.7 Design of Semigravity Retaining Walls 429 -- 12.8 Effects of Surcharge 433 -- 12.9 Estimating Sizes of Cantilever Retaining Walls 434 -- 12.10 Design Procedure for Cantilever Retaining Walls 438 -- 12.11 Cracks and Wall Joints 450 -- Chapter 13 Continuous Reinforced Concrete Structures 459 -- 13.2 General Discussion of Analysis Methods 459 -- 13.3 Qualitative Influence Lines 460 -- 13.4 Limit Design 463 -- 13.5 Limit Design Under the ACI Code 471 -- 13.6 Preliminary Design of Members 474 -- 13.7 Approximate Analysis of Continuous Frames for Vertical Loads 475 -- 13.8 Approximate Analysis of Continuous Frames for Lateral Loads 486 -- 13.9 Computer Analysis of Building Frames 490 -- 13.10 Lateral Bracing for Buildings 490 -- 13.11 Development Length Requirements for Continuous Members 491 -- Chapter 14 Torsion 503 -- 14.2 Torsional Reinforcing 505 -- 14.3 Torsional Moments that Have to be Considered in Design 507 -- 14.4 Torsional Stresses 509 -- 14.5 When Torsional Reinforcing is Required by the ACI 510 -- 14.6 Torsional Moment Strength 511 -- 14.7 Design of Torsional Reinforcing 512 -- 14.8 Additional ACI Requirements 513 -- 14.9 Example Problems Using U.S.
Customary Units 514 -- 14.10 SI Equations and Example Problem 518 -- 14.11 Computer Example 521 -- Chapter 15 Two-Way Slabs, Direct Design Method 527 -- 15.2 Analysis of Two-Way Slabs 530 -- 15.3 Design of Two-Way Slabs by the ACI Code 531 -- 15.4 Column and Middle Strips 532 -- 15.5 Shear Resistance of Slabs 532 -- 15.6 Depth Limitations and Stiffness Requirements 536 -- 15.7 Limitations of Direct Design Method 541 -- 15.8 Distribution of Moments in Slabs 542 -- 15.9 Design of an Interior Flat Plate 548 -- 15.10 Placing of Live Loads 554 --
15.11 Analysis of Two-Way Slabs with Beams 554 -- 15.12 Transfer of Moments and Shears Between Slabs and Columns 561 -- 15.13 Openings in Slab Systems 567 -- Chapter 16 Two-Way Slabs, Equivalent Frame Method 569 -- 16.1 Moment Distribution for Nonprismatic Members 569 -- 16.2 Introduction to the Equivalent Frame Method 570 -- 16.3 Properties of Slab Beams 572 -- 16.4 Properties of Columns 575 -- 16.5 Example Problems 577 -- 16.6 Computer Analysis 582 -- Chapter 17 Walls 585 -- 17.2 Non-Load-Bearing Walls 585 -- 17.3 Load-Bearing Concrete Walls--Empirical Design Method 586 -- 17.4 Load-Bearing Concrete Walls--Rational Design 590 -- 17.5 Shear Walls 590 -- 17.6 ACI Provisions for Shear Walls 594 -- 17.7 Economy in Wall Construction 598 -- Chapter 18 Prestressed Concrete 601 -- 18.2 Advantages and Disadvantages of Prestressed Concrete 603 -- 18.3 Pretensioning and Posttensioning 604 -- 18.4 Materials Used for Prestressed Concrete 605 -- 18.5 Stress Calculations 607 -- 18.6 Shapes of Prestressed Sections 611 -- 18.7 Prestress Losses 614 -- 18.8 Ultimate Strength of Prestressed Sections 617 -- 18.9 Deflections 621 -- 18.10 Shear in Prestressed Sections 626 -- 18.11 Design of Shear Reinforcement 628 -- 18.12 Additional Topics 631 -- Chapter 19 Formwork 639 -- 19.2 Responsibility for Formwork Design 640 -- 19.3 Materials Used for Formwork 641 -- 19.4 Furnishing of Formwork 642 -- 19.5 Economy in Formwork 642 -- 19.6 Form Maintenance 643 -- 19.8 Forces Applied to Concrete Forms 647 -- 19.9 Analysis of Formwork for Floor and Roof Slabs 650 -- 19.10 Design of Formwork for Floor and Roof Slabs 661 -- 19.11 Design of Shoring 663 -- 19.12 Bearing Stresses 670 -- 19.13 Design of Formwork for Walls 673 -- Appendix A Tables and Graphs, U.S. Customary Units 677 -- Appendix B Tables in Si Units 712 -- Appendix C Alternate Design Method 720 -- Appendix D Overreinforced Beams 727.
Summary An introductory book presenting the theories, ACI Code requirements and design of reinforced concrete beams, slabs, columns, footings, retaining walls, bearing walls, prestressed concrete sections, and framework in a clear and understandable manner.
System notes System requirements for accompanying computer optical laser discs: For Windows 95, 98, or NT 4.0.
Subject Reinforced concrete construction.
ISBN 0471395765 (cloth : alk. paper)