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Title A century of sonnets : the romantic-era revival, 1750-1850 / edited by Paula R. Feldman [and] Daniel Robinson.

Published New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.

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 UniM Bail  820.9 CENT    AVAILABLE
Physical description xix, 279 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (pages 21-22) and index.
Contents |/|rThomas Edwards (1699-1757) --|g1.|tOn a Family-Picture|g25 --|g2.|t'Tongue-doughty pedant'|g25 -- / |rThomas Gray (1716-71) --|g3.|tOn the Death of Mr. Richard West|g26 -- / |rThomas Warton (1728-90) --|g4.|t'While summer-suns o'er the gay prospect played'|g27 --|g5.|tTo the River Lodon|g27 -- / |rJohn Codrington Bampfylde (1754-96) --|g6.|t'As when, to one who long hath watched'|g28 --|g7.|tWritten at a Farm|g28 --|g8.|tOn a Frightful Dream|g28 --|g9.|tOn Christmas|g29 -- / |rCharlotte Smith (1749-1806) --|g10.|t'The partial Muse has from my earliest hours'|g29 --|g11.|tWritten at the Close of Spring|g30 --|g12.|tTo a Nightingale|g30 --|g13.|tTo the Moon|g31 --|g14.|tTo the South Downs|g31 --|g15.|tTo Sleep|g31 --|g16.|tSupposed to be Written by Werter|g32 --|g17.|tBy the Same. To Solitude|g32 --|g18.|tBy the Same|g32 --|g19.|tFrom Petrarch|g33 --|g20.|t'Blest is yon shepherd, on the turf reclined'|g33 --|g21.|tWritten on the Sea Shore.--October, 1784|g34 --|g22.|tTo the River Arun|g34 --|g23.|tTo Melancholy. Written on the Banks of the Arun, October 1785|g34 --|g24.|tTo the Naiad of the Arun|g35 --|g25.|t'Should the lone wanderer, fainting on his way'|g35 --|g26.|tTo Night|g35 --|g27.|tWritten in the Churchyard at Middleton in Sussex|g36 --|g28.|tCaptive Escaped in the Wilds of America. Addressed to the Hon. Mrs. O'Neill|g36 --|g29.|tTo Dependence|g37 --|g30.|tWritten in September 1791, During a Remarkable Thunder Storm|g37 --|g31.|tOn Being Cautioned Against Walking on an Headland Overlooking the Sea|g37 --|g32.|t'Where the wild woods and pathless forests frown'|g38 --|g33.|tSea View|g38 --|g34.|tWritten Near a Port on a Dark Evening|g39 --|g35.|tWritten at Bignor Park in Sussex, in August, 1799|g39 -- / |rSamuel Egerton Brydges (1762-1837) --|g36.|tOn Dreams|g39 --|g37.|t'No more by cold philosophy confined'|g40 -- / |rWilliam Hayley (1745-1820) --|g38.|tTo Mrs. Hayley, On her Voyage to America. 1784|g40 -- / |rMary Hays (1760-1843) --|g39.|t'Ah! let not hope fallacious, airy, wild'|g41 -- / |rHelen Maria Williams (1761?-1827) --|g40.|tTo Twilight|g42 --|g41.|tTo Hope|g42 --|g42.|tTo the Moon|g43 --|g43.|tTo the Strawberry|g43 --|g44.|tTo the Curlew|g43 --|g45.|tTo the Torrid Zone|g44 --|g46.|tTo the White Bird of the Tropic|g44 -- / |rWilliam Lisle Bowles (1762-1850) --|g47.|tTo a Friend|g45 --|g48.|t'Languid, and sad, and slow'|g45 --|g49.|tWritten at Tinemouth, Northumberland, after a Tempestuous Voyage|g45 --|g50.|tWritten at Bamborough Castle|g46 --|g51.|tTo the River Wensbeck|g46 --|g52.|tTo the River Tweed|g47 --|g53.|tTo the River Itchin, Near Winton|g47 --|g54.|tOn Dover Cliffs. July 20, 1787|g47 --|g55.|tTo the River Cherwell|g48 -- / |rThomas Russell (1762-88) --|g56.|t'Oxford, since late I left thy peaceful shore'|g48 --|g57.|tTo Valclusa|g49 --|g58.|t'Dear Babe, whose meaning by fond looks expressed'|g49 --|g59.|tTo the Spider|g49 --|g60.|tTo the Owl|g50 -- / |rMary Locke (fl. 1791-1816) --|g61.|t'I hate the Spring in parti-colored vest'|g50 -- / |rAnn Radcliffe (1764-1823) --|g62.|tTo the Visions of Fancy|g51 --|g63.|tSun-Rise: A Sonnet|g51 --|g64.|tNight|g52 --|g65.|t'Now the bat circles on the breeze of eve'|g52 --|g66.|tStoried Sonnet|g53 --|g67.|tTo the Bat|g53 -- / |rAnna Maria Jones (1748-1829) --|g68.|tTo Echo|g54 --|g69.|tTo the Moon|g54 -- / |rSamuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) --|g70-80.|tSonnets on Eminent Characters --|g81.|tTo the Autumnal Moon|g60 --|g82.|tOn a Discovery Made Too Late|g60 --|g83.|tTo the River Otter|g61 --|g84.|tTo a Friend, Who Asked How I Felt, When the Nurse First Presented My Infant to Me|g61 --|g85-87.|tSonnets, Attempted in the Manner of 'Contemporary Writers' --|g88.|tTo W. L. Esq. While He Sung a Song to Purcell's Music|g62 --|g89.|tFancy in Nubibus. Or The Poet in the Clouds|g63 --|g90.|tWork Without Hope|g63 --|g91.|tOld Man's Sigh. A Sonnet|g64 --|g92.|tLife|g64 --|g93.|tPantisocracy|g64 -- / |rAmelia Opie (1769-1853) --|g94.|tTo Winter|g65 --|g95.|tOn the Approach of Autumn|g65 -- / |rJohn Thelwall (1764-1834) --|g96.|tTo Tyranny|g66 --|g97.|tTo Ancestry|g66 --|g98.|tVanity of National Grandeur|g67 --|g99.|tOn the Rapid Extension of the Suburbs|g67 -- / |rMary Julia Young (fl. 1789-1808) --|g100.|tTo Dreams|g68 --|g101.|tAnxiety|g68 --|g102.|tFriendship|g69 --|g103.|tTo Time|g69 --|g104.|tTo My Pen|g70 --|g105.|tOn an Early Spring|g70 -- / |rCharles Lamb (1775-1834) --|g106.|t'Was it some sweet device of faery land'|g71 --|g107.|t'We were two pretty babes'|g71 --|g108.|t'O! I could laugh to hear the midnight wind'|g71 --|g109.|t'If from my lips some angry accents fell'|g72 --|g110.|tFamily Name|g72 -- / |rMary Robinson (1758-1800) --|g111-154.|tSappho and Phaon --|g155.|tLaura to Petrarch|g90 -- / |rAnn Yearsley (1752-1806) --|g156.|tTo--|g90 -- / |rWilliam Beckford (1760-1844) --|g157.|tElegiac Sonnet to a Mopstick|g91 -- / |rCharles Lloyd (1775-1839) --|g158.|t'My pleasant home! where erst when sad and faint'|g91 --|g159.|t'Oh, I have told thee every secret care'|g92 --|g160.|tWritten at the Hotwells, near Bristol|g92 --|g161.|t'Erst when I wandered far from those I loved'|g93 --|g162.|t'Oh, she was almost speechless!'|g93 --|g163.|t'Whether thou smile or frown, thou beauteous face'|g93 --|g164.|tMetaphysical Sonnet|g94 -- / |rRobert Southey (1774-1843) --|g165-170.|tPoems on the Slave Trade --|g171.|tTo a Goose|g97 --|g172.|tWinter|g97 -- / |rEdward Gardner (fl. 1770-98) --|g173.|tWritten in Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire|g97 --|g174.|tTo Love|g98 -- / |rJoseph Hucks (d. 1800) --|g175.|tTo Freedom|g99 -- / |rAnna Seward (1742-1809) --|g176.|t'When Life's realities the Soul perceives'|g99 --|g177.|tTo a Friend, Who Thinks Sensibility a Misfortune|g100 --|g178.|t'By Derwent's rapid stream as oft I strayed'|g100 --|g179.|t'Seek not, my Lesbia, the sequestered dale'|g100 --|g180.|tTo Honora Sneyd|g101 --|g181.|t'Ingratitude, how deadly is thy smart'|g101 --|g182.|tTo--|g101 --|g183.|tDecember Morning|g102 --|g184.|t'In every breast affection fires, there dwells'|g102 --|g185.|tTo Mr. Henry Cary, On the Publication of his Sonnets|g103 --|g186.|tTo a Young Lady, Purposing to Marry a Man of Immoral Character in the Hope of his Reformation|g103 --|g187.|tTo the Poppy|g103 --|g188.|tOn a Lock of Miss Sarah Seward's Hair Who Died in her Twentieth Year|g104 --|g189.|t'On the damp margin of the sea-beat shore'|g104 --|g190.|tWritten December 1790|g104 -- / |rJane West (1758-1852) --|g191.|tTo May|g105 -- / |rAnn Home Hunter (1742-1821) --|g192.|tWinter|g106 -- / |rEliza Kirkham Mathews (1772-1802) --|g193.|tIndian|g107 -- / |rWilliam Cowper (1731-1800) --|g194.|tTo Mrs. Unwin|g107 --|g195.|tTo George Romney, Esq.|g108 -- / |rHenry Kirke White (1785-1806) --|g196.|t'Give me a cottage on some Cambrian wild'|g108 --|g197.|tWinter Traveler|g109 -- / |rMrs. B. Finch (fl. 1805) --|g198.|tWritten in a Shrubbery Towards the Decline of Autumn|g109 --|g199.|tWritten in a Winter's Morning|g110 -- / |rAnna Maria Smallpiece (fl. 1805) --|g200.|tWritten in Ill Health|g110 --|g201.|t'The veil's removed, the gaudy, flimsy veil'|g111 -- / |rWilliam Wordsworth (1770-1850) --|g202.|tOn Seeing Miss Helen Maria Williams Weep at a Tale of Distress|g111 --|g203.|t1801|g112 --|g204.|t'"With how sad steps, O Moon thou climb'st the sky"'|g112 --|g205.|t'Nuns fret not at their convent's narrow room'|g112 --|g206.|t'How sweet it is, when mother Fancy rocks'|g113 --|g207.|t'Where lies the land to which you ship must go?'|g113 --|g208.|tComposed after a Journey across the Hamilton Hills, Yorkshire|g114 --|g209.|t'These words were uttered in a pensive mood'|g114 --|g210.|t'With ships the sea was sprinkled far and nigh'|g114 --|g211.|tComposed Upon Westminster Bridge, Sept.
3, 1803 115 -- 212. 'Methought I saw the footsteps of a throne' 115 -- 213. 'The world is too much with us' 115 -- 214. 'It is a beauteous evening, calm and free' 116 -- 215. Composed by the Sea-Side, near Calais, August, 1802 116 -- 216. To Toussaint L'Ouverture 117 -- 217. London, 1802 117 -- 218. October, 1803 117 -- 219. 'Surprised by joy--impatient as the wind' 118 -- 220-252. River Duddon -- 253. Mutability 131 -- 254. 'Scorn not the Sonnet' 131 -- 255. Steamboats, Viaducts, and Railways 131 -- 256. 'Most sweet it is with unuplifted eyes' 132 -- 257. On the Projected Kendal and Windermere Railway 132 -- / Mathilda Betham (1776-1852) -- 258. 'Urge me no more!' 133 -- 259. To a Llangollen Rose, the Day after It Had Been Given by Miss Ponsonby 133 -- / Susan Evance (fl. 1808-18) -- 260. To Melancholy 134 -- 261. Written in a Ruinous Abbey 134 -- 262. To a Violet 135 -- 263. To the Clouds 135 -- 264. Written in Ill Health at the Close of Spring 135 -- 265. Written at Netley Abbey 136 -- / Martha Hanson (fl. 1809) -- 266. To Fancy 136 -- 267. Occasioned by Reading Mrs. M.[ary] Robinson's Poems 137 --
268. 'How proudly Man usurps the power to reign' 137 -- 269. To Mrs. Charlotte Smith 138 -- / Mary F. Johnson (fl. 1810; d. 1863) -- 270. Thunder Storm 138 -- 271. Second Evening 139 -- 272. Village Maid 139 -- 273. Invocation to the Spirit Said to Haunt Wroxall Down 139 -- 274. Idiot Girl 140 -- 275. Widow's Remarriage 140 -- / Mary Tighe (1772-1810) -- 276. Written at Scarborough. August, 1799 141 -- 277. 'As one who late hath lost a friend adored' 141 -- 278. 'When glowing Phoebus quits the weeping earth' 142 -- 279. Written in Autumn 142 -- 280. 'Poor, fond deluded heart!' 142 -- 281. Written at Rossana. November 18, 1799 143 -- 282. Written at the Eagle's Nest, Killarney. July 26, 1800 143 -- 283. Written at Killarney. July 29, 1800 143 -- 284. To Death 144 -- 285. 'Can I look back, and view with tranquil eye' 144 -- 286. 1802 145 -- / Leigh Hunt (1784-1859) -- 287. To Hampstead ('Sweet upland, to whose walks with fond repair') 145 -- 288. To Hampstead ('Winter has reached thee once again at last') 146 -- 289. On the Grasshopper and Cricket 146 -- 290. To Percy Shelley, on the Degrading Notions of Deity 146 -- 291. To the Same 147 -- 292. To John Keats 147 -- 293. Nile 148 -- / Mary Bryan (fl. 1815) -- 294. Maniac 148 -- 295. To My Brother ('O, thou art far away from me--dear boy!') 149 -- 296. To My Brother ('Once in our customed walk a wounded bird') 149 -- 297. To-- --('O thou unknown disturber of my rest') 150 -- 298. To-- --('O timeless guest!--so soon returned art thou') 150 -- / George Gordon, Lord Byron (1788-1824) -- 299. On Chillon 151 -- 300. 'Rousseau--Voltaire--our Gibbon--and de Stael' 151 -- / John Keats (1795-1821) -- 301. To Solitude 152 -- 302. On First Looking into Chapman's Homer 152 -- 303. To ****** 152 -- 304. Written on the Day that Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison 153 -- 305. 'How many bards gild the lapses of time!' 153 -- 306. To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses 154 -- 307. 'Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there' 154 -- 308. 'To one who has been long in city pent' 154 -- 309. On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour 155 -- 310. Addressed to Haydon 155 -- 311. Addressed to the Same 155 -- 312. On the Grasshopper and Cricket 156 -- 313. To Kosciusko 156 -- 314. 'Happy is England! I could be content' 157 -- 315. 'After dark vapors have oppressed our plains' 157 -- 316. To Haydon, with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles 157 -- 317. On Seeing the Elgin Marbles 158 -- 318. To Ailsa Rock 158 -- 319. To a Cat 158 -- 320. 'If by dull rhymes our English must be chained' 159 -- 321. On Fame 159 -- 322. 'Bright star! would I were steadfast as thou art' 160 -- 323. 'The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone!' 160 -- 324. To Sleep 160 -- 325. 'O Chatterton! how very sad thy fate!' 161 -- 326. 'O thou! whose face hath felt the winter's wind' 161 -- 327. 'When I have fears that I may cease to be' 161 -- 328. 'Why did I laugh tonight?' 162 -- 329. 'I cry your mercy--pity--love!--aye, love!' 162 -- / Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822) -- 330. To Wordsworth 163 -- 331. Feelings of a Republican on the Fall of Bonaparte 163 -- 332. Ozymandias 164 -- 333. Ode to the West Wind 164 -- 334. Political Greatness 166 -- 335. 'Lift not the painted veil' 167 -- 336. England in 1819 167 -- / Jane Alice Sargant (fl. 1817-21) -- 337. 'Lo, on her dying couch, the sufferer lies' 168 -- 338. 'How gladly would I lay my aching head' 168 -- / Thomas Doubleday (1790-1870) -- 339. 'Poppies, that scattered o'er this arid plain' 168 -- 340. 'No walk today;--November's breathings toss' 169 -- 341. 'Friends, when my latest bed of rest is made' 169 -- / Horace Smith (1779-1849) -- 342. Ozymandias 170 -- / John Clare (1793-1864) -- 343. Primrose 170 -- 344. Gypsy's Evening Blaze 171 -- 345. To an Hour-Glass 171 -- 346. To an Angry Bee 172 -- 347. Last of April 172 -- 348. Winter 172 -- 349. To the Memory of John Keats 173 -- 350. Rural Scenes 173 -- 351. Shepherd's Tree 173 -- 352. Wren 174 -- 353. Wryneck's Nest 174 -- 354. Nutting 175 -- 355. Shadows 175 -- 356. A Woodland Seat 175 -- / Samuel Rogers (1763-1855) -- 357. To the Fragment of a Statue of Hercules, Commonly Called the Torso 176 -- / Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1803-49) -- 358. To Night 176 -- / Charles Johnston (d. 1823) -- 359. 'I know thee not, bright creature, ne'er shall know' 177 -- 360. 'Spirit of evil, with which the earth is rife' 177 -- / Elizabeth Cobbold (1767-1824) -- 361-363. Sonnets of Laura -- 364. On Some Violets Planted in My Garden by a Friend 179 -- / John F. M. Dovaston (1782-1852) -- 365. 'Streamlet! methinks thy lot resembles mine' 180 -- 366. 'There are who say the sonnet's meted maze' 180 -- / Sarah Hamilton (c. 1769-1843) -- 367. Farewell to France 181 -- 368. Poppy 181 -- / Thomas Moore (1779-1852) -- 369. No--Leave My Heart to Rest 182 -- 370. Fancy 182 -- / William Ewart Gladstone (1809-98) -- 371. To a Rejected Sonnet 183 -- / Mary Russell Mitford (1787-1855) -- 372. Forget-Me-Not 184 -- 373. On a Beautiful Woman 184 -- / Barry Cornwall (Bryan Waller Procter) (1787-1874) -- 374. To My Child 185 -- / Joseph Blanco White (1775-1841) -- 375. Night and Death 185 -- / Thomas Hood (1799-1845) -- 376. Written in the Workhouse 186 -- 377. To the Ocean 186 -- 378. False Poets and True 187 -- 379. Sonnet to a Sonnet 187 -- / Edward Moxon (1801-58) -- 380. 'Loud midnight-soothing melancholy bird' 188 -- / William Stanley Roscoe (1753-1831) -- 381. Camellia 188 -- 382. To the Harvest Moon 189 -- 383. On Being Forced to Part with his Library for the Benefit of his Creditors 189 -- / Charles Tennyson Turner (1808-79) -- 384. 'When lovers' lips from kissing disunite' 190 -- 385. 'Hence with your jeerings, petulant and low' 190 -- 386. 'No trace is left upon the vulgar mind' 190 -- 387. 'O'erladen with sad musings' 191 -- 388. 'The bliss of Heaven, Maria, shall be thine' 191 -- 389. 'His was a chamber in the topmost tower' 192 -- / Alfred Tennyson (1809-92) -- 390. 'Check every outflash, every ruder sally' 192 -- 391. 'Mine be the strength of spirit fierce and free' 193 -- 392. 'As when with downcast eyes we muse and brood' 193 -- / Agnes Strickland (1796-1874) -- 393. Self-Devoted 194 -- 394. Forsaken 194 -- 395. Maniac 195 -- 396. Infant 195 -- / Frederick Tennyson (1807-98) -- 397. Poetical Happiness 196 -- / Hartley Coleridge (1796-1849) -- 398. 'Long time a child, and still a child' 196 -- 399. Dedicatory Sonnet, To S. T. Coleridge 197 -- 400. To a Friend 197 -- 401. 'Is love a fancy, or a feeling?' 197 -- 402. November 198 -- 403. First Birthday 198 -- 404. 'If I have sinned in act, I may repent' 198 -- 405. 'All Nature ministers to Hope' 199 -- / Letitia Elizabeth Landon (1802-38) -- 406. Dancing Girl 200 -- 407. Castle of Chillon 200 -- / Jane Cross Simpson (1811-86) -- 408. 'Oh! if thou lov'st me, love me not so well!' 201 -- / Felicia Hemans (1793-1835) -- 409. Vigil of Rizpah 201 -- 410. Mary at the Feet of Christ 202 -- 411. Memorial of Mary 202 -- 412. Mountain Sanctuaries 203 -- 413. Olive Tree 203 -- 414. A Remembrance of Grasmere 203 -- 415. Foliage 204 -- / Caroline Norton (1808-77) -- 416. 'In the cold change, which time hath wrought on love' 204 -- 417. 'Like an enfranchised bird, who wildly springs' 205 -- 418. To My Books 205 -- / Ebenezer Elliott (1781-1849) -- 419. Powers of the Sonnet 206 -- 420. Criticism 206 -- / Frederick William Faber (1814-63) -- 421. Confessional 207 -- 422. After-State 207 -- 423. A Dream of Blue Eyes 207 -- 424. Sonnet-writing. To F. W.
F. 208 -- / Frances Anne Kemble (1809-93) -- 425. 'Whene'er I recollect the happy time' 208 -- 426. 'Cover me with your everlasting arms' 209 -- / Eliza Cook (1818-89) -- 427. Written at the Couch of a Dying Parent 209 -- / Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-61) -- 428. 'Here am I yet, another twelvemonth spent' 210 -- 429. 'Yes, I have lied, and so must walk my way' 210 -- / Calder Campbell (1798-1857) -- 430. 'When midst the summer-roses' 211 -- / William Bell Scott (1811-90) -- 431. Early Aspirations 212 -- / William Michael Rossetti (1829-1919) -- 432. Jesus Wept 212 -- / Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828-82) -- 433-438. Sonnets for Pictures -- / Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-61) -- 439-481. Sonnets from the Portuguese -- Appendix Mary Robinson's Preface to Sappho and Phaon 233.
Summary A Century of Sonnets is a striking reminder that some of the best-known and most well-respected poems of the Romantic era were sonnets. It presents the broad and rich context of such favorites as Percy Bysshe Shelley's "Ozymandias," John Keats's "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer," and William Wordsworth's "Composed Upon Westminster Bridge" by tracing the sonnet revival in England from its beginning in the hands of Thomas Edwards and Charlotte Smith to its culmination in the poetry of Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Dante Gabriel Rossetti.
Expertly edited by Paula R. Feldman and Daniel Robinson, this volume is the first in modern times to collect the sonnets of the Romantic period - many never before published in the twentieth century - and contains nearly five hundred examples composed between 1750 and 1850 by 81 poets, nearly half of them women. A Century of Sonnets includes in their entirety such important but difficult to find sonnet sequences as William Wordsworth's The River Duddon, Mary Robinson's Sappho and Phaon, and Robert Southey's Poems on the Slave Trade, along with Browning's enduring classic, Sonnets from the Portuguese.
Other author Feldman, Paula R.
Robinson, Daniel, 1969-
Subject Sonnets, English.
English poetry -- 18th century.
English poetry -- 19th century.
Romanticism -- Great Britain.
ISBN 0195115619 (alk. paper)
0195115619 No price