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Cover Art
PRINTED BOOKS
Author Kadish, Jules E.

Title Satellite communications fundamentals / Jules E. Kadish, Thomas W. R. East.

Published Boston, Mass. ; London : Artech House, [2000]
©2000

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM Store Engin  621.3825 KADI    AVAILABLE
Physical description xix, 487 pages : illustrations, maps, portraits ; 24 cm.
Series Artech House space technology and applications series.
Artech House space technology and applications library.
Notes Includes index.
One CD-ROM in pocket attached to inside back cover.
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents 1 What this book is all about 1 -- 2 An overview of satellite communications 5 -- 2.1 Electronic communications 5 -- 2.2 Repeater stations 7 -- 2.3 Position of the satellite 7 -- 2.4 Some advantages of satellite communications 8 -- 2.5 Some history 9 -- 2.6 Elliptical and geosynchronous orbits 13 -- 2.7 Frequencies used by satellites 16 -- 2.8 Satellite footprints 18 -- 3 Gravity and the geostationary satellite 21 -- 3.2 Units used in this text 22 -- 3.3 Fundamentals of gravity 25 -- 3.4 Geostationary satellites 27 -- 3.5 Gravity 28 -- 3.6 Centrifugal force 32 -- 3.7 A quick review of calculus 32 -- 3.8 Determining the geostationary altitude 37 -- 3.9 Orbits 40 -- 3.10 Placing a geostationary satellite in its orbit 46 -- 3.11 Potential damage to satellites: Van Allen radiation belts 48 -- 3.12 Other satellite orbits--Molniya 49 -- 3.13 Other satellite orbits--Walker constellations 50 -- 3.14 Low Earth-orbiting satellites (LEO) 51 -- 3.15 Comparison of orbit features 54 -- 4 Geometry of the geostationary satellite 59 -- 4.2 Satellite distance and angles 60 -- 4.3 Earth station-to-satellite distance 61 -- 4.4 Azimuth and elevation angles from the Earth station to the satellite 63 -- 4.5 Variation of elevation angle and distance to satellite with latitude 66 -- 4.6 Antenna mounts for home dishes 67 -- 4.7 Polar mount 67 -- 4.8 Error angle when using polar mount 69 -- 4.9 Mounts for larger antennas 71 -- 5 Electricity and magnetism 73 -- 5.2 Electric field, electrostatics, and electricity 75 -- 5.3 Voltage as a scalar potential 82 -- 5.4 Magnetic field 84 -- 5.5 Magnetic field produced by a current of electricity 87 -- 5.6 Maxwell's displacement currents 92 -- 6 Maxwell's equations 101 -- 6.2 Some general concepts 102 -- 6.3 Maxwell's first equation 105 -- 6.4 Maxwell's second equation 106 -- 6.5 Maxwell's third equation 106 -- 6.6 Maxwell's fourth equation 107 -- 6.7 Maxwell's four equations in vector format 109 -- 6.8 Maxwell's equations in free space 111 -- 6.9 Scalar and vector potentials 112 -- 7 Wave equation 117 -- 7.3 Velocity of light and of electromagnetic waves 121 -- 7.4 Traveling waves 124 -- 7.5 Electromagnetic plane waves 126 -- 7.6 Polarization 130 -- 7.7 Energy in the electromagnetic wave 131 -- 7.8 Power per square meter in the electromagnetic wave 134 -- 7.9 Poynting vector 136 -- 8 Transmission lines and radiation 139 -- 8.2 Some basic concepts about transmission lines 140 -- 8.3 Inductance, capacitance, AC current, and voltage 140 -- 8.4 Equivalent circuit to a transmission line 142 -- 8.5 Analysis of the equivalent circuit 142 -- 8.6 Sinusoidal representation of the wave equation 144 -- 8.7 Characteristic impedance 145 -- 8.8 Some typical values 146 -- 8.9 Terminated transmission line 146 -- 8.10 Shorted, or open-terminated, line, standing waves 149 -- 8.11 E and B waves on the transmission line 150 -- 8.12 Flared open-ended transmission line 151 -- 8.13 Waveguides 152 -- 8.14 Radiation and the accelerating charge 156 -- 8.15 Mechanism of electromagnetic wave generation 159 -- 8.16 Retarded potentials and radiation 162 -- 9 Parabolic antennas 171 -- 9.2 Dipoles, horns, and arrays 172 -- 9.3 A brief history 176 -- 9.4 Geometry of the parabola 179 -- 9.5 Parabolic antenna pattern--introduction 182 -- 9.6 Gain, aperture illumination, beamwidth, and sidelobes 187 -- 9.7 Small dish for satellite reception 191 -- 9.8 Cassegrainian parabola 191 -- 9.9 Noise entering the antenna 192 -- 9.10 Noise temperature, cosmic noise, and atmospheric absorption 194 -- 9.11 Noise temperature and attenuation 197 -- 9.12 Antenna gain measurement 198 -- 9.13 Feed systems 199 -- 9.14 Resume of important equations 206 -- 10 Noise 211 -- 10.2 Thermal noise 212 -- 10.3 Attenuators 215 -- 10.4 Amplifiers 217 -- 10.5 Noise figure 219 -- 10.6 Other sources of noise 219 -- 11 Atmosphere and ionosphere 227 -- 11.2 Atmospheric gases 229 -- 11.3 Weather 232 -- 11.4 Noise temperature 248 -- 11.5 Ionosphere 248 -- 12 Earth stations and introduction to modulation 251 -- 12.2 Configuration of an Earth station 251 -- 12.3 Introduction to modulation 254 -- 12.4 Amplitude modulation 255 -- 12.5 Frequency modulation 256 -- 12.6 Digital modulation 260 -- 12.7 Multiple access 270 -- 13 Satellite downlink and its link budget 279 -- 13.2 Satellite transponder EIRP 280 -- 13.3 Noise power 282 -- 13.4 Noise bandwidth 285 -- 13.5 C/N power ratio 286 -- 13.6 C/N and S/N 287 -- 13.7 Noise amplitude above threshold 293 -- 13.8 TV postdetection filters 294 -- 13.9 Improvement factor 297 -- 13.10 Signal output from the detector 297 -- 13.11 Signal-to-noise power ratio, S/N 298 -- 13.12 Reception quality, C/N and S/N 299 -- 14 Satellite uplink, the satellite, and the link budget 303 -- 14.2 Flux density, EIRP, and losses 303 -- 14.3 Uplink 304 -- 14.4 Special uplink considerations 306 -- 14.5 Companded FM SCPC 307 -- 14.6 Satellite 309 -- 14.7 Overall link budget--noise 313 -- 14.8 Link optimization in FM systems 314 -- 15 FM threshold 317 -- 15.2 Review of S/N versus C/N above threshold 318 -- 15.3 Click mechanism 320 -- 15.4 S/N below threshold 321 -- 15.5 RMS noise frequency 322 -- 15.6 Probability of a click 323 -- 15.7 Click rate, energy per hertz, and click power 325 -- 15.8 S/N versus C/N above and below threshold 325 -- 16 Digital communications 329 -- 16.2 Some prominent personalities 330 -- 16.3 Source and channel coding and decoding 337 -- 16.4 Bit errors and error correction 338 -- 16.5 Bandwidth and roll-off 342 -- 16.6 Symbol and bit errors in received QPSK 344 -- 16.7 Forward error correction (FEC) and Viterbi coding 349 -- 16.8 Compressed video system 351 -- 16.9 Statistical multiplexing 355 -- 17 Video compression 359 -- 17.2 Resolution 359 -- 17.3 Redundancy 360 -- 17.4 How high compression is achieved 361 -- 17.5 MPEG 361 -- 17.6 Discrete cosine transform 363 -- 17.7 Two-dimensional DCT 366 -- 17.8 Intracoding an I picture 367 -- 17.9 Zigzag scanning and entropy coding 368 -- 17.10 Decoder 370 -- 17.11 Coding moving pictures 371 -- 17.12 Motion prediction 372 -- 17.13 Motion compensation 373 -- 17.14 MPEG audio 374 -- 18.2 Program contents 378 -- 18.3 Some generalities concerning program inputs 379 -- 18.4 Installing the CD programs 380 -- 19.1 Past 381 -- 19.2 Present 382 -- 19.3 Future 383 -- Appendix 1 Historical perspective 387 -- Appendix 2 A review of vector analysis 423 -- Appendix 3 Link budget analysis 443.
Summary Written for professionals who need a fundamental understanding of satellite communications and related disciplines, this unique book explains the underpinnings, introduces key personalities, and probes emerging issues in this exciting field. The authors discuss key topics such as orbital mechanics, electromagnetic theory, and atmospheric effects on signals, earth stations, digital communications, and video compression, The CD-ROM performs rapid calculations on various problems that are explored.
Other author East, Thomas W. R.
Subject Artificial satellites in telecommunication.
ISBN 1580531369 £64.00
1580531369 (alk. paper)