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PRINTED BOOKS
Author Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de, 1547-1616.

Title Don Quixote / Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra ; translated by Edith Grossman ; with a new introduction by Harold Bloom.

Published New York : Ecco, 2003.

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM Bail  863.3 CERVANT    ON HOLDSHELF
Uniform title Don Quixote. English
Edition 1st ed.
Physical description xxxv, 940 pages ; 25 cm
Contents Introduction: Don Quixote, Sancho Panza, and Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra / Harold Bloom xxi -- First Part of the Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha -- To the Book of Don Quixote of La Mancha 11 -- Part One of the Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha 19 -- Chapter I Which describes the condition and profession of the famous gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha 19 -- Chapter II Which tells of the first sally that the ingenious Don Quixote made from his native land 24 -- Chapter III Which recounts the amusing manner in which Don Quixote was dubbed a knight 29 -- Chapter IV Concerning what happened to our knight when he left the inn 35 -- Chapter V In which the account of our knight's misfortune continues 41 -- Chapter VI Regarding the beguiling and careful examination carried out by the priest and the barber of the library of our ingenious gentleman 45 -- Chapter VII Regarding the second sally of our good knight Don Quixote of La Mancha 53 -- Chapter VIII Regarding the good fortune of the valorous Don Quixote in the fearful and never imagined adventure of the windmills, along with other events worthy of joyful remembrance 58 -- Part Two of the Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha -- Chapter IX In which the stupendous battle between the gallant Basque and the valiant Manchegan is concluded and comes to an end 65 -- Chapter X Concerning what further befell Don Quixote with the Basque and the danger in which he found himself with a band of Galicians from Yanguas 70 -- Chapter XI Regarding what befell Don Quixote with some goatherds 75 -- Chapter XII Regarding what a goatherd recounted to those who were with Don Quixote 81 -- Chapter XIII In which the tale of the shepherdess Marcela is concluded, and other events are related 86 -- Chapter XIV In which are found the desperate verses of the deceased shepherd, along with other unexpected occurrences 94 -- Part Three of the Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha -- Chapter XV In which is recounted the unfortunate adventure that Don Quixote happened upon when he happened upon some heartless Yanguesans 102 -- Chapter XVI Regarding what befell the ingenious gentleman in the inn that he imagined to be a castle 109 -- Chapter XVII Which continues the account of the innumerable difficulties that the brave Don Quixote and his good squire, Sancho Panza, experienced in the inn that, to his misfortune, he thought was a castle 116 -- Chapter XVIII Which relates the words that passed between Sancho Panza and his master, Don Quixote, and other adventures that deserve to be recounted 124 -- Chapter XIX Regarding the discerning words that Sancho exchanged with his master, and the adventure he had with a dead body, as well as other famous events 134 -- Chapter XX Regarding the most incomparable and singular adventure ever concluded with less danger by a famous knight, and which was concluded by the valiant Don Quixote of La Mancha 141 -- Chapter XXI Which relates the high adventure and rich prize of the helmet of Mambrino, as well as other things that befell our invincible knight 152 -- Chapter XXII Regarding the liberty that Don Quixote gave to many unfortunate men who, against their wills, were being taken where they did not wish to go 163 -- Chapter XXIII Regarding what befell the famous Don Quixote in the Sierra Morena, which was one of the strangest adventures recounted in this true history 173 -- Chapter XXIV In which the adventure of the Sierra Morena continues 182 -- Chapter XXV Which tells of the strange events that befell the valiant knight of La Mancha in the Sierra Morena, and of his imitation of the penance of Beltenebros 190 -- Chapter XXVI In which the elegant deeds performed by an enamored Don Quixote in the Sierra Morena continue 205 -- Chapter XXVII Concerning how the priest and the barber carried out their plan, along with other matters worthy of being recounted in this great history 212 -- Part Four of the Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha -- Chapter XXVIII Which recounts the novel and agreeable adventure that befell the priest and the barber in the Sierra Morena 227 -- Chapter XXIX Which recounts the amusing artifice and arrangement that was devised for freeing our enamored knight from the harsh penance he had imposed on himself 239 -- Chapter XXX Which recounts the good judgment of the beautiful Dorotea, along with other highly diverting and amusing matters 249 -- Chapter XXXI Regarding the delectable words that passed between Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, his squire, as well as other events 258 -- Chapter XXXII Which recounts what occurred in the inn to the companions of Don Quixote 266 -- Chapter XXXIII Which recounts the novel of The Man Who Was Recklessly Curious 272 -- Chapter XXXIV In which the novel of The Man Who Was Recklessly Curious continues 289 -- Chapter XXXV In which the novel of The Man Who Was Recklessly Curious is concluded 305 -- Chapter XXXVI Which recounts the fierce and uncommon battle that Don Quixote had with some skins of red wine, along with other unusual events that occurred in the inn 313 -- Chapter XXXVII In which the history of the famous Princess Micomicona continues, along with other diverting adventures 321 -- Chapter XXXVIII Which tells of the curious discourse on arms and letters given by Don Quixote 330 -- Chapter XXXIX In which the captive recounts his life and adventures 334 -- Chapter XL In which the history of the captive continues 341 -- Chapter XLI In which the captive continues his tale 352 -- Chapter XLII Which recounts further events at the inn as well as many other things worth knowing 368 -- Chapter XLIII Which recounts the pleasing tale of the muledriver's boy, along with other strange events that occurred at the inn 374 -- Chapter XLIV In which the remarkable events at the inn continue 383 -- Chapter XLV In which questions regarding the helmet of Mambrino and the packsaddle are finally resolved, as well as other entirely true adventures 391 -- Chapter XLVI Regarding the notable adventure of the officers of the Holy Brotherhood, and the great ferocity of our good knight Don Quixote 398 -- Chapter XLVII Regarding the strange manner in which Don Quixote of La Mancha was enchanted, and other notable events 405 -- Chapter XLVIII In which the canon continues to discuss books of chivalry, as well as other matters worthy of his ingenuity 414 -- Chapter XLIX Which recounts the clever conversation that Sancho Panza had with his master, Don Quixote 421 -- Chapter L Regarding the astute arguments that Don Quixote had with the canon, as well as other matters 428 -- Chapter LI Which recounts what the goatherd told to all those who were taking Don Quixote home 433 -- Chapter LII Regarding the quarrel that Don Quixote had with the goatherd, as well as the strange adventure of the penitents, which he brought to a successful conclusion by the sweat of his brow 438 -- Second Part of the Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha -- Chapter I Regarding what transpired when the priest and the barber discussed his illness with Don Quixote 459 -- Chapter II Which deals with the notable dispute that Sancho Panza had with Don Quixote's niece and housekeeper, as well as other amusing topics 469 -- Chapter III Regarding the comical discussion held by Don Quixote, Sancho Panza, and Bachelor Sanson Carrasco 473 -- Chapter IV In which Sancho Panza satisfies Bachelor Sanson Carrasco with regard to his doubts and questions, with other events worthy of being known and recounted 480 -- Chapter V Concerning the clever and amusing talk that passed between Sancho Panza and his wife, Teresa Panza, and other events worthy of happy memory 485 -- Chapter VI Regarding what transpired between Don Quixote and his niece and housekeeper, which is one of the most important chapters in the entire history 491 -- Chapter VII Regarding the conversation that Don Quixote had with his squire, as well as other exceptionally famous events 496 -- Chapter VIII Which recounts what befell Don Quixote as he was going to see his lady Dulcinea of Toboso 502 -- Chapter IX Which recounts what will soon be seen 509 -- Chapter X Which recounts Sancho's ingenuity in enchanting the lady Dulcinea, and other events as ridiculous as they are true 513 -- Chapter
XI Regarding the strange adventure that befell the valiant Don Quixote with the cart or wagon of The Assembly of Death 521 -- Chapter XII Regarding the strange adventure that befell the valiant Don Quixote and the courageous Knight of the Mirrors 526 -- Chapter XIII In which the adventure of the Knight of the Wood continues, along with the perceptive, unprecedented, and amiable conversation between the two squires 533 --
Chapter XIV In which the adventure of the Knight of the Wood continues 538 -- Chapter XV Which recounts and relates the identity of the Knight of the Mirrors and his squire 548 -- Chapter XVI Regarding what befell Don Quixote with a prudent knight of La Mancha 550 -- Chapter XVII In which the heights and extremes to which the remarkable courage of Don Quixote could and did go is revealed, along with the happily concluded adventure of the lions 558 -- Chapter XVIII Regarding what befell Don Quixote in the castle or house of the Knight of the Green Coat, along with other bizarre matters 567 -- Chapter XIX Which recounts the adventure of the enamored shepherd, and other truly pleasing matters 576 -- Chapter XX Which recounts the wedding of rich Camacho, as well as what befell poor Basilio 582 -- Chapter XXI Which continues the account of the wedding of Camacho, along with other agreeable events 591 -- Chapter XXII Which recounts the great adventure of the Cave of Montesinos that lies in the heart of La Mancha, which was successfully concluded by the valiant Don Quixote of La Mancha 597 -- Chapter XXIII Regarding the remarkable things that the great Don Quixote said he saw in the depths of the Cave of Montesinos, so impossible and extraordinary that this adventure has been considered apocryphal 604 -- Chapter XXIV In which a thousand trifles are recounted, as irrelevant as they are necessary to a true understanding of this great history 614 -- Chapter XXV In which note is made of the braying adventure and the diverting adventure of the puppet master, along with the memorable divinations of the soothsaying monkey 620 -- Chapter XXVI In which the diverting adventure of the puppet master continues, along with other things that are really very worthwhile 628 -- Chapter XXVII In which the identities of Master Pedro and his monkey are revealed, as well as the unhappy outcome of the braying adventure, which Don Quixote did not conclude as he had wished and intended 636 -- Chapter XXVIII Regarding matters that Benengeli says will be known to the reader if he reads with attention 642 -- Chapter XXIX Regarding the famous adventure of the enchanted boat 647 -- Chapter XXX Regarding what befell Don Quixote with a beautiful huntress 653 -- Chapter XXXI Which deals with many great things 657 -- Chapter XXXII Regarding the response that Don Quixote gave to his rebuker, along with other events both grave and comical 665 -- Chapter XXXIII Regarding the delightful conversation that the duchess and her ladies had with Sancho Panza, one that is worthy of being read and remembered 677 -- Chapter XXXIV Which recounts the information that was received regarding how the peerless Dulcinea of Toboso was to be disenchanted, which is one of the most famous adventures in this book 683 -- Chapter XXXV In which the information that Don Quixote received regarding the disenchantment of Dulcinea continues, along with other remarkable events 690 -- Chapter XXXVI Which recounts the strange and unimaginable adventure of the Dolorous Duenna, also known as the Countess Trifaldi, as well as a letter that Sancho Panza wrote to his wife, Teresa Panza 697 -- Chapter XXXVII In which the famous adventure of the Dolorous Duenna continues 702 -- Chapter XXXVIII Which recounts the tale of misfortune told by the Dolorous Duenna 704 -- Chapter XXXIX In which the Countess Trifaldi continues her stupendous and memorable history 710 -- Chapter XL Regarding matters that concern and pertain to this adventure and this memorable history 713 -- Chapter XLI Regarding the arrival of Clavileno, and the conclusion of this lengthy adventure 718 -- Chapter XLII Regarding the advice Don Quixote gave to Sancho Panza before he went to govern the insula, along with other matters of consequence 727 -- Chapter XLIII Regarding the second set of precepts that Don Quixote gave to Sancho Panza 732 -- Chapter XLIV How Sancho Panza was taken to his governorship, and the strange adventure that befell Don Quixote in the castle 737 -- Chapter XLV Regarding how the great Sancho Panza took possession of his insula, and the manner in which he began to govern 746 -- Chapter XLVI Regarding the dreadful belline and feline fright received by Don Quixote in the course of his wooing by the enamored Altisidora 753 -- Chapter XLVII In which the account of how Sancho Panza behaved in his governorship continues 757 -- Chapter XLVIII Regarding what transpired between Don Quixote and Dona Rodriguez, duenna to the duchess, as well as other events worthy of being recorded and remembered forever 765 -- Chapter XLIX Regarding what befell Sancho Panza as he patrolled his insula 772 -- Chapter L Which declares the identities of the enchanters and tormentors who beat the duenna and pinched and scratched Don Quixote, and recounts what befell the page who carried the letter to Teresa Sancha, the wife of Sancho Panza 782 -- Chapter LI Regarding the progress of Sancho Panza's governorship, and other matters of comparable interest 790 -- Chapter LII Which recounts the adventure of the second Dolorous, or Anguished, Duenna, also called Dona Rodriguez 798 -- Chapter LIII Regarding the troubled end and conclusion of the governorship of Sancho Panza 804 -- Chapter LIV Which deals with matters related to this history and to no other 809 -- Chapter LV Regarding certain things that befell Sancho on the road, and others that are really quite remarkable 817 -- Chapter LVI Regarding the extraordinary and unprecedented battle that Don Quixote of La Mancha had with the footman Tosilos in defense of the daughter of the duenna Dona Rodriguez 823 -- Chapter LVII Which recounts how Don Quixote took his leave of the duke, and what befell him with the clever and bold Altisidora, the duchess's maiden 828 -- Chapter LVIII Which recounts how so many adventures rained down on Don Quixote that there was hardly room for all of them 832 -- Chapter LIX Which recounts an extraordinary incident that befell Don Quixote and can be considered an adventure 842 -- Chapter LX Concerning what befell Don Quixote on his way to Barcelona 849 -- Chapter LXI Regarding what befell Don Quixote when he entered Barcelona, along with other matters that have more truth in them than wit 861 -- Chapter LXII Which relates the adventure of the enchanted head, as well as other foolishness that must be recounted 864 -- Chapter LXIII Regarding the evil that befell Sancho Panza on his visit to the galleys, and the remarkable adventure of the beautiful Morisca 875 -- Chapter LXIV Which deals with the adventure that caused Don Quixote more sorrow than any others that had befallen him so far 884 -- Chapter LXV Which reveals the identity of the Knight of the White Moon, and recounts the release of Don Gregorio, as well as other matters 888 -- Chapter LXVI Which recounts what will be seen by whoever reads it, or heard by whoever listens to it being read 893 -- Chapter LXVII Regarding the decision Don Quixote made to become a shepherd and lead a pastoral life until the year of his promise had passed, along with other incidents that are truly pleasurable and entertaining 898 -- Chapter LXVIII Regarding the porcine adventure that befell Don Quixote 902 -- Chapter LXIX Concerning the strangest and most remarkable event to befall Don Quixote in the entire course of this great history 907 -- Chapter LXX Which follows chapter LXIX, and deals with matters necessary to the clarity of this history 912 -- Chapter LXXI What befell Don Quixote and his squire, Sancho, as they were traveling to their village 919 -- Chapter LXXII Concerning how Don Quixote and Sancho arrived in their village 924 -- Chapter LXXIII Regarding the omens Don Quixote encountered as he entered his village, along with other events that adorn and lend credit to this great history 929 -- Chapter LXXIV Which deals with how Don Quixote fell ill, and the will he made, and his death 934.
Summary Edith Grossman's definitive English translation of the Spanish masterpiece. Widely regarded as the world's first modern novel, and one of the fanniest and most tragic books ever written, Don Quixote chronicles the famous picaresque adventures of the noble knight-errant Don Quixote of La Mancha and his faithful squire, Sancho Panza, as they travel through sixteenth-century Spain. Unless you read Spanish, you've never read Don Quixote.
Other author Grossman, Edith, 1936-
Bloom, Harold.
ISBN 0060188707 (alk. paper)