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LEADER 00000nam a22004214a 4500 
001    000026979232 
005    20050914222759.0 
008    050412s2005    dcua     b    001 0 eng   
010    2005042649 
019 1  26979232 
020    9780821361993 
020    0821361996 
020    0821362003|q(e-ISBN) 
035    .b29858070 
040    DLC|beng|cDLC|dDLC 
042    pcc 
050 00 RA644.M2|bR67 2005 
050 00 RA644.M2|bA28 2005 
082 00 362.196/9362|222 
245 00 Rolling back malaria :|bthe World Bank global strategy & 
       booster program / [Malaria Task Force]. 
264  1 Washington, DC :|bThe World Bank,|c2005. 
300    xvi, 193 pages :|billustrations ;|c24 cm 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    unmediated|bn|2rdamedia 
338    volume|bnc|2rdacarrier 
500    "A multidisciplinary Malaria Task Force prepared this 
       report ..."--Foreword. 
500    "DOI: 10.1596/978-0-8213-6100-3"--T.p. verso. 
504    Includes bibliographical references (pages 183-187) and 
       index. 
505 00 |g2|tRationale for a Renewed World Bank Effort on Malaria
       |g13 --|g2.1|tMalaria Impairs Economic Growth and Human 
       Development|g14 --|g2.2|tMalaria Is Preventable and 
       Curable, with Good Returns on Investment|g15 --|g2.3
       |tSuccess Is Possible on a Large Scale|g16 --|g2.4|tThere 
       is a Wide Gap between Knowing and Doing|g18 --|g2.5|tWorld
       Bank Has Underused its Comparative Advantage in Malaria 
       Control|g24 --|g2.6|tClients and Partners Demand a 
       Stronger World Bank Effort|g34 --|g3|tPriorities and 
       Business Model|g37 --|g4|tProgram of Action|g43 --|g4.1
       |tProgram and Deliverables|g43 --|g4.2|tInternational 
       Finance Corporation and the Private Sector in Malaria 
       Control|g45 --|g4.3|tCooperation with the Global Fund and 
       Other Major Partners in Malaria Control|g50 --|g5|tMalaria
       Task Force|g53 --|g5.2|tOversight|g54 --|g5.3|tStaffing: 
       Secretariat and Regional Clusters|g54 --|g5.4|tFinancing 
       the Malaria Task Force|g54 --|g6|tResults-Based Monitoring
       and Evaluation|g57 --|g6.1|tResults Framework|g57 --|g6.2
       |tSteps to a Results-Based Monitoring and Evaluation 
       System|g58 --|g6.3|tRBM Technical Strategies and 
       Indicators of Population Coverage|g59 --|gAppendix 1
       |tOutline of the Monitoring and Evaluation Framework|g61 -
       -|gA1.1|tSupport to Countries|g61 --|gA1.2|tSupport to 
       Regional/Global Partnerships and Collective Efforts|g63 --
       |gA1.3|tStrengthening of Bank's Capacity to Contribute 
       Effectively to Malaria Control|g64 --|gAppendix 2
       |tMalarial Case Notification and Coverage with Key 
       Interventions|g67 --|tData Tables --|g1|tMalarial Case 
       Notification: Malaria Notifications for the Most Recent 
       Year Information Received|g70 --|g2|tMalarial Case 
       Notification: Standardized Malaria Notifications and 
       Notification Rates per 1,000, since 1990|g80 --|g3
       |tPercentage of Households That Have at Least One Mosquito
       Net, by Background Characteristics|g96 --|g4|tPercentage 
       of Households That Have at Least One Insecticide-treated 
       Mosquito Net, by Background Characteristics|g100 --|g5
       |tPercentage of Children under Five Years Old That Slept 
       under a Mosquito Net during the Night Preceding the Survey,
       by Background Characteristics|g104 --|g6|tPercentage of 
       Children under Five Years Old That Slept under an 
       Insecticide-treated Mosquito Net during the Night 
       Preceding the Survey, by Background Characteristics|g110 -
       -|g7|tPercentage of Pregnant Women That Slept under a 
       Mosquito Net during the Night Preceding the Survey, by 
       Background Characteristics|g116 --|g8|tPercentage of 
       Pregnant Women That Slept under an Insecticide-treated 
       Mosquito Net during the Night Preceding the Survey, by 
       Background Characteristics|g118 --|g9|tPregnant Women 
       Receiving Sulfadoxine Pyrimethamine (SP) at Least Once 
       during Pregnancy (Community Level, Prevention or 
       Treatment), by Background Characteristics|g120 --|g10
       |tPregnant Women Receiving Sulfadoxine Pyrimethamine (SP) 
       at Least Twice during Pregnancy (Community Level, 
       Prevention or Treatment), by Background Characteristics
       |g120 --|g11|tPregnant Women Receiving Sulfadoxine 
       Pyrimethamine (SP) at Least Once during an Antenatal Visit,
       by Background Characteristics|g122 --|g12|tPregnant Women 
       Receiving Sulfadoxine Pyrimethamine (SP) at Least Twice 
       during an Antenatal Visit, by Background Characteristics
       |g122 --|g13|tPercentage of Children under Five Years Old 
       with Reported Fever in the Two Weeks Prior to the Survey, 
       by Background Characteristics|g124 --|g14|tPercentage of 
       Febrile Children under Five Years Old That Received 
       Treatment with Chloroquine, by Background Characteristics
       |g132 --|g15|tPercentage of Febrile Children under Five 
       Years Old That Received Treatment with Sulfadoxine 
       Pyrimethamine (SP), by Background Characteristics|g136 --
       |g16|tPercentage of Febrile Children under Five Years Old 
       That Received Treatment with Any Antimalarial, by 
       Background Characteristics|g140 --|g17|tSummary of 
       Antimalarial Drug Efficacy Results, Expressed as Treatment
       Failure|g144 --|gAppendix 3|tFour Success Stories: Malaria
       Control in Brazil, Eritrea, India, and Vietnam|g157 --
       |gAppendix 4|tStrategic Communications|g171 --|gAppendix 5
       |tHigh-Impact Partnerships: Private Sector and Civil 
       Society|g175 --|gAppendix 6|tImpact of Malaria on 
       Schoolchildren and the Education Sector|g179 --|gBox 1
       |tMalaria and Selected MDGs|g4 --|gFigure 2.1|tProfile in 
       Contrasts: The Persistent Burden of Malaria in Africa|g17 
       --|gTable 2.1|tOwnership of Insecticide-treated Bed Nets 
       in Malawi, by Income Group|g19 --|gFigure 2.2|tAccess to 
       Antimalarial Treatment|g20 --|gFigure 2.3|tIncreasing 
       Costs of Commodities for Malaria Control|g24 --|gFigure 
       2.4|tEffectiveness of PRSPs in Addressing Malaria|g29 --
       |gFigure 2.5|tMalaria Control Efforts Have Not Benefited 
       from Increased Health Spending in Ghana|g33 --|gTable 3.1
       |tBooster Program for Malaria Control: Matrix of Options 
       for Financing and Instruments|g41 --|gBox 2.1|tPutting the
       Bank's Comparative Advantage to Work: Assisting Countries 
       to Develop Strategies for Financing Treatment with ACTs
       |g45 --|gTable 4.1|tBooster Program for Malaria: 
       Deliverables|g46 --|gTable 5.1|tPotential Staffing and 
       Distribution of the Malaria Task Force|g55. 
610 20 World Bank.|0http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79043403
650  0 Malaria.|0http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/
       sh85080038 
710 2  World Bank.|0http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79043403
710 2  World Bank.|bMalaria Task Force.|0http://id.loc.gov/
       authorities/names/n2005066094 
907    .b29858070 
984    VU|cheld 
990    MARCIVE MELB 201906 
Location Call No. Status
 UniM BioMed ST  362.1969362 ROLL    AVAILABLE