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Cover Art
PRINTED BOOKS
Author Nawy, Edward G.

Title Prestressed concrete : a fundamental approach / Edward G. Nawy.

Published Upper Saddle River, NJ : Prentice Hall, [2003]
©2003

Copies

Location Call No. Status
 UniM ERC  624.183412 NAWY    AVAILABLE
Edition 4th ed.
Physical description xx,939 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm.
Series Prentice-Hall international series in civil engineering and engineering mechanics.
Prentice-Hall international series in civil engineering and engineering mechanics.
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents 1.2 Historical Development of Prestressing 5 -- 1.3 Basic Concepts of Prestressing 7 -- 1.4 Computation of Fiber Stresses in a Prestressed Beam by the Basic Method 19 -- 1.5 C-Line Computation of Fiber Stresses 21 -- 1.6 Load-Balancing Computation of Fiber Stresses 22 -- 1.7 SI Working Stress Concepts 23 -- 2 Materials and Systems for Prestressing 31 -- 2.1 Concrete 31 -- 2.2 Stress-Strain Curve of Concrete 36 -- 2.3 Modulus of Elasticity and Change in Compressive Strength with Time 36 -- 2.4 Creep 43 -- 2.5 Shrinkage 48 -- 2.6 Nonprestressing Reinforcement 50 -- 2.7 Prestressing Reinforcement 53 -- 2.8 ACI Maximum Permissible Stresses in Concrete and Reinforcement 59 -- 2.9 AASHTO Maximum Permissible Stresses in Concrete and Reinforcement 60 -- 2.10 Prestressing Systems and Anchorages 61 -- 2.11 Circular Prestressing 70 -- 2.12 Ten Principles 70 -- 3 Partial Loss of Prestress 73 -- 3.2 Elastic Shortening of Concrete (ES) 75 -- 3.3 Steel Stress Relaxation (R) 78 -- 3.4 Creep Loss (CR) 80 -- 3.5 Shrinkage Loss (SH) 83 -- 3.6 Losses Due to Friction (F) 85 -- 3.7 Anchorage-Seating Losses (A) 88 -- 3.8 Change of Prestress Due to Bending of a Member ([Delta]f[subscript pB]) 90 -- 3.9 Step-by-Step Computation of All Time-Dependent Losses in a Pre-Tension Beam 90 -- 3.10 Step-by-Step Computation of All Time-Dependent Losses in a Post-Tension Beam 96 -- 3.11 Lump-Sum Computation of Time-Dependent Losses in Prestress 99 -- 3.12 SI Prestress Loss Expressions 100 -- 4 Flexural Design of Prestressed Concrete Elements 106 -- 4.2 Selection of Geometrical Properties of Section Components 108 -- 4.3 Service-Load Design Examples 115 -- 4.4 Proper Selection of Beam Sections and Properties 128 -- 4.5 End Blocks at Support Anchorage Zones 139 -- 4.6 Flexural Design of Composite Beams 158 -- 4.7 Summary of Step-by-Step Trial-and-Adjustment Procedure for the Service-Load Design of Prestressed Members 162 -- 4.8 Design of Composite Post-Tensioned Prestressed Simply Supported Section 165 -- 4.9 Ultimate-Strength Flexural Design 178 -- 4.10 Load and Strength Factors 181 -- 4.11 ACI Load Factors and Safety Margins 184 -- 4.12 Limit State in Flexure at Ultimate Load in Bonded Members: Decompression to Ultimate Load 188 -- 4.13 Preliminary Ultimate-Load Design 202 -- 4.14 Summary Step-by-Step Procedure for Limit at Failure Design of the Prestressed Members 204 -- 4.15 Ultimate Strength Design of Prestressed Simply Supported Beam by Strain Compatibility 209 -- 4.16 Strength Design of Bonded Prestressed Simply Supported Beam Using Approximate Procedures 212 -- 4.17 SI Flexural Design Expression 216 -- 5 Shear and Torsional Strength Design 223 -- 5.2 Behavior of Homogeneous Beams in Shear 224 -- 5.3 Behavior of Concrete Beams as Nonhomogeneous Sections 227 -- 5.4 Concrete Beams without Diagonal Tension Reinforcement 228 -- 5.5 Shear and Principal Stresses in Prestressed Beams 232 -- 5.6 Web-Shear Reinforcement 238 -- 5.7 Horizontal Shear Strength in Composite Construction 242 -- 5.8 Web Reinforcement Design Procedure for Shear 246 -- 5.9 Principal Tensile Stresses in Flanged Sections and Design of Dowel-Action Vertical Steel in Composite Sections 249 -- 5.10 Dowel Steel Design for Composite Action 250 -- 5.11 Dowel Reinforcement Design for Composite Action in an Inverted T-Beam 251 -- 5.12 Shear Strength and Web-Shear Steel Design in a Prestressed Beam 253 -- 5.13 Web-Shear Steel Design by Detailed Procedures 256 -- 5.14 Design of Web Reinforcement for a PCI Standard Double Composite T-Beam 259 -- 5.15 Brackets and Corbels 263 -- 5.16 Torsional Behavior and Strength 278 -- 5.17 Torison in Reinforced and Prestressed Concrete Elements 284 -- 5.18 Design Procedure for Combined Torsion and Shear 304 -- 5.19 Design of Web Reinforcement for Combined Torsion and Shear in Prestressed Beams 308 -- 5.20 SI Combined Torsion and Shear Design of Prestressed Beam 317 -- 6 Indeterminate Prestressed Concrete Structures 324 -- 6.2 Disadvantages of Continuity in Prestressing 325 -- 6.3 Tendon Layout for Continuous Beams 325 -- 6.4 Elastic Analysis for Prestress Continuity 328 -- 6.5 Examples Involving Continuity 331 -- 6.6 Linear Transformation and Concordance of Tendons 338 -- 6.7 Ultimate Strength and Limit State at Failure of Continuous Beams 342 -- 6.8 Tendon Profile Envelope and Modifications 346 -- 6.9 Tendon and C-Line Location in Continuous Beams 346 -- 6.10 Tendon Transformation to Utilize Advantages of Continuity 357 -- 6.11 Design for Continuity Using Nonprestressed Steel at Support 362 -- 6.12 Indeterminate Frames and Portals 363 -- 6.13 Limit Design (Analysis) of Indeterminate Beams and Frames 385 -- 7 Camber, Deflection, and Crack Control 402 -- 7.2 Basic Assumptions in Deflection Calculations 403 -- 7.3 Short-Term (Instantaneous) Deflection of Uncracked and Cracked Members 404 -- 7.4 Short-Term Deflection at Service Load 417 -- 7.5 Short-Term Deflection of Cracked Prestressed Beams 423 -- 7.6 Construction of Moment-Curvature Diagram 424 -- 7.7 Long-Term Effects on Deflection and Camber 430 -- 7.8 Permissible Limits of Calculated Deflection 437 -- 7.9 Long-Term Camber and Deflection Calculation by the PCI Multipliers Method 438 -- 7.10 Long-Term Camber and Deflection Calculation by the Incremental Time-Steps Method 442 -- 7.11 Long-Term Camber and Deflection Computation by the Approximate Time-Steps Method 453 -- 7.12 Long-Term Deflection of Composite Double-T Cracked Beam 456 -- 7.13 Cracking Behavior and Crack Control in Prestressed Beams 463 -- 7.14 Crack Width and Spacing Evaluation in Pretensioned T-Beam Without Mild Steel 469 -- 7.15 Crack Width and Spacing Evaluation in Pretensioned T-Beam Containing Nonprestressed Steel 470 -- 7.16 Crack Width and Spacing Evaluation in Pretensioned I-Beam Containing Nonprestressed Mild Steel 471 -- 7.17 Crack Width and Spacing Evaluation for Post-tensioned T-Beam Containing Nonprestressed Steel 472 -- 7.18 Crack Control by ACI Code Provisions 474 -- 7.19 SI Deflection and Cracking Expressions 474 -- 7.20 SI Deflection Control 475 -- 7.21 SI Crack Control 480 -- 8 Prestressed Compression and Tension Members 484 -- 8.2 Prestressed Compression Members: Load-Moment Interaction in Columns and Piles 485 -- 8.3 Strength Reduction Factor [phi] 491 -- 8.4 Operational Procedure for the Design of Nonslender Prestressed Compression Members 492 -- 8.5 Construction of Nominal Load-Moment (P[subscript n]-M[subscript n]) and Design (P[subscript u]-M[subscript u]) Interaction Diagrams 493 -- 8.6 Limit State at Buckling Failure of Slender (Long) Prestressed Columns 499 -- 8.7 Moment Magnification Method: First-Order Analysis 504 -- 8.8 Second-Order Frame Analysis and P - [Delta] Effects 507 -- 8.9 Operational Procedure and Flowchart for the Design of Slender Columns 509 -- 8.10 Design of Slender (Long) Prestressed Column 509 -- 8.11 Compression Members in Biaxial Bending 515 -- 8.12 Practical Design Considerations 521 -- 8.13 Reciprocal Load Method for Biaxial Bending 524 -- 8.14 Modified Load Contour Method for Biaxial Bending 526 -- 8.15 Prestressed Tension Members 528 -- 8.16 Suggested Step-by-Step Procedure for the Design of Tension Members 532 -- 8.17 Design of Linear Tension Members 532 -- 9 Two-Way Prestressed Concrete Floor Systems 538 -- 9.1 Introduction: Review of Methods 538 -- 9.2 Flexural Behavior of Two-Way Slabs and Plates 542 -- 9.3 Equivalent Frame Method 543 -- 9.4 Two-Directional Load Balancing 551 -- 9.5 Flexural Strength of Prestressed Plates 553 -- 9.6 Bending of Prestressing Tendons and Limiting Concrete Stresses 556 -- 9.7 Load-Balancing Design of a Single-Panel Two-Way Floor Slab 561 -- 9.8 One-Way Slab Systems 566 -- 9.9 Shear-Moment Transfer to Columns Supporting Flat Plates 567 -- 9.10 Step-by-Step Trial-and-Adjustment Procedure for the Design of a Two-Way Prestressed Slab and Plate System 571 -- 9.11 Design of Prestressed Post-Tensioned Flat-Plate Floor System 576 -- 9.12 Direct Method of Deflection Evaluation 593 -- 9.13 Deflection Evaluation of Two-Way Prestressed Concrete Floor Slabs 597 -- 9.14 Yield-Line Theory
for Two-Way-Action Plates 600 -- 9.15 Yield-Line Moment Strength of a Two-Way Prestressed Concrete Plate 612 -- 10 Connections for Prestressed Concrete Elements 616 -- 10.2 Tolerances 617 -- 10.3 Composite Members 617 -- 10.4 Reinforced Concrete Bearing in Composite Members 618 -- 10.5 Dapped-End Beam Connections 624 -- 10.6 Reinforced Concrete Brackets and Corbels 631 -- 10.7 Concrete Beam Ledges 631 -- 10.8 Selected Connection Details 635 --
11 Prestressed Concrete Circular Storage Tanks and Steel Roofs 644 -- 11.2 Design Principles and Procedures 645 -- 11.3 Moment M[subscript 0] and Ring Force Q[subscript 0] in Liquid Retaining Tank 658 -- 11.4 Ring Force Q[subscript y] at Intermediate Heights of Wall 660 -- 11.5 Cylindrical Steel Membrane Coefficients 661 -- 11.6 Prestressing Effects on Wall Stresses for Fully Hinged, Partially Sliding and Hinged, Fully Fixed, and Partially Fixed Bases 663 -- 11.7 Recommended Practice for Situ-Cast and Precast Prestressed Concrete Circular Storage Tanks 688 -- 11.8 Crack Control in Walls of Circular Prestressed Concrete Tanks 692 -- 11.9 Tank Roof Design 692 -- 11.10 Prestressed Concrete Tanks with Circumferential Tendons 699 -- 11.11 Seismic Design of Liquid Containment Tank Structures 699 -- 11.12 Step-by-Step Procedure for the Design of Circular Prestressed Concrete Tanks and Dome Roofs 704 -- 11.13 Design of Circular Prestressed Concrete Water-Retaining Tank and Its Domed Roof 711 -- 12 LRFD and Standard AASHTO Design of Concrete Bridges 726 -- 12.1 Introduction: Safety and Reliability 726 -- 12.2 AASHTO Standard (LFD) and LRFD Truck Load Specifications 728 -- 12.3 Flexural Design Considerations 742 -- 12.4 Shear Design Considerations 746 -- 12.5 Horizontal Interface Shear 750 -- 12.6 Combined Shear and Torsion 753 -- 12.7 AASHTO-LRFD Flexural-Strength Design Specifications vs. ACI Code Provisions 755 -- 12.8 Step-by-Step Design Procedure (LRFD) 758 -- 12.9 LRFD Design of Bulb-Tee Bridge Deck 762 -- 12.10 LRFD Shear and Deflection Design 776 -- 12.11 Standard AASHTO Flexural Design of Prestressed Bridge Deck Beams (LFD) 783 -- 12.12 Standard AASHTO Shear Reinforcement Design of Bridge Deck Beams 791 -- 12.13 Shear and Torsion Reinforcement Design of a Box-Girder Bridge 795 -- 12.14 LRFD Major Design Expressions in Sl Format 802 -- 13 Seismic Design of Prestressed Concrete Structures 806 -- 13.1 Introduction: Mechanism of Earthquakes 806 -- 13.2 Spectreal Response Method 811 -- 13.3 Equivalent Lateral Force Method 819 -- 13.4 Seismic Shear Forces in Beams and Columns of a Frame: Strong Column-Weak Beam Concept 826 -- 13.5 ACI Confining Reinforcements for Structural Concrete Members 829 -- 13.6 Seismic Design Concepts in High Rise Buildings and Other Structures 837 -- 13.7 Structural Systems in Seismic Zones 840 -- 13.8 Dual Systems 849 -- 13.9 Design Procedure for Earthquake-Resistant Structures 852 -- 13.10 Sl Seismic Design Expressions 856 -- 13.11 Seismic Base Shear and Lateral Forces and Moments by the IBC Approach 859 -- 13.12 Seismic Shear Wall Design and Detailing 862 -- 13.13 Example 13.3 Structural Precast Wall Base Connection Design 867 -- 13.14 Design of Precast Prestressed Ductile Frame Connection in a High Rise Building in High-Seismicity Zone Using Dywidag Ductile Connection Assembly (DDC) 870 -- 13.15 Design of Precast Prestressed Ductile Frame Connection in a High-Rise Building in High-Seismicity Zone Using a Hybrid Connector System 875 -- Appendix A Computer Programs in Q-Basic 885 -- Appendix B Unit Conversions, Design Information, Properties of Reinforcement 899 -- Appendix C Selected Typical Standard Precast Double Tees, Inverted Tees, Hollow Core Sections, and AASHTO Bridge Sections 920.
Summary A state-of-the-art book written by a national and international expert on concrete structures and materials, this fourth edition of Prestressed Concrete -- A Fundamental Approach reflects the very latest ACI 318-02 Code, International Building Code IBC 2000-2003, and AASHTO 2002. It puts at the disposal of the user the author's many years of professional and academic know-how in design, construction, and forensic engineering. This book is different from most because its major topics of material behavior, prestress losses, flexure, shear, torsion, and deflection-camber are sequentially self-contained and can be covered in one semester at the senior and the graduate levels. It uniquely follows procedures given in over 20 flowcharts and 400 illustrations that simplify the understanding and application of the subject in design, using both the customary US and the SI units in the examples.
Subject Prestressed concrete construction.
ISBN 0130083917